Custom Dates

Dates

For instance, 1763-01
For instance, 1888-12
Showing 1 - 25 of 40 results

Pages

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Jane H. Nicholas Randolph, 18 Feb. 1816

The fears that you expressed of my having scolded a great deal at your not answering my letter by Brother Jefferson were groundless. I assure you I was not so unreasonable as to expect you to write when you were sick or busy you mention’d in your last letter to Brother that you had heard of Mama...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Jane H. Nicholas Randolph, 16 Sept. 1817

I suppose you have heard the reason of our coming to this place, as soon as Aunt Randolph tasted the waters a Striblings she was convinced that they were not strong enough to be at all effectual, & she said as we had come so far it would be a pitty to return with out having recieved any...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Jane H. Nicholas Randolph, [ca. Dec. 1817?]

My utmost exertions availed me nothing My Dearest Sister in my endeavours to get the “Balance of comfort” to you by breakfast to day, and I am not sure that you will get it before dinner Papa is to carry it over to EgEdgehill and send it to you from there. have you got the 1st vol.? for I dont...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Nicholas P. Trist, 7 Apr. 1822

All your letters bring the same charge, of want of punctuality, against me, & I do not think that I deserve it in the least. you have written me seven letters, the two last of which I received together,—dated 24th of Feb. & 10th of March—while spending a week at Ashton from whence I...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Nicholas P. Trist, 5 June 1822

I take advantage of the first mail since the receipt of your letter dated the 5th of May, to answer it My Dear Nicholas, and assure you that you were right in supposing that the charge of little Mary would be as much my happiness as my duty. I already feel warmly interested in the poor little...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Nicholas P. Trist, 27 June 1822

The clouds and mist which have envelloped us continually, have I fear imparted some of their dullness to my brain, for in several attempts that I have made to write to you, My Dearest Nicholas, I have found it too barren to furnish one page of sense. I wish the sun would deign to show his blessed...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Nicholas P. Trist, 19 Aug. 1822

I hope the fever which you have had is not the prelude of a more serious attack, My Dear Nicholas, but as this is the most sickly part of the year I would recommend great care of your health, to preserve which, strict attention to the diet, regular exercise before the heat of the day, and an...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Nicholas P. Trist, 31 Oct. 1822

I have waited a few days to enable me to have a good report to give you of Mama’s health, Dearest Nicholas, in my answer to the letter I received from you a few days ago. when I wrote last I mention’d a slight head-ache which she Mama was afflicted with, but which lasted a very short time;...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Nicholas P. Trist, 12 Nov. 1822

I have been disappointed in hearing from you as I expected certainly to have done this evening, My Dear Nicholas, and have a great mind not to write to you atall, until I do get a letter, but as you have constituted your self the “repository” of all that passes in my thoughts, the terror and...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Nicholas P. Trist, 20 Dec. 1822

A long and unavoidable separation from one so much loved, as you are , Dearest Nicholas, would be painful enough without the fears and melancholy forebodings that I have on the subject of your health. You are already sick and your strength prostrated by one summer spent in Louisiana, how then am...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Nicholas P. Trist, 16 Jan. 1823

I am a lady of so much importance during this month that I can scarcely command time enough to write to you ; but at least if my letters afford you the pleasure you say they do, it is a fresh inducement for me to make the attempt. in this short piece I have been twice interrupted.—Hugh Minor was...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Nicholas P. Trist, 4 Feb. 1823

The post brought me two letters from you this evening Dearest Nicholas, and has made my conscience smite me for the unjust suspicions I had allowed to creep into my mind during a month—wanting only a few days—that I did not hear from you except by the means of Mama and Sister Ellen. those...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Nicholas P. Trist, 5 June 1823

As you have had an explanation of this silence of rather more than three weeks, you can have felt no uneasiness, or conceived yourself neglected atall, I shall therefore make no excuses, but proceed to tell you what a pleasant visit we have had to Bedford, and that Grand-Papa bore the fatigue of...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Nicholas P. Trist, 21 July 1823

Mrs. Trist with Emma & Mr. Gilmer arrived at Farmington a few days ago, My Dear Nicholas, and this morning Mama & Aunt Randolph have gone to pay their respects and learn from your Grand-Mother when we shall have the pleasure of seeing her here. She bore the journey from Bedford very well,...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Nicholas P. Trist, 3 Aug. 1823

I am grieved to hear of your affair with Mr. Tournillon, My Dearest Nicholas, but I trust that it will be amicably adjusted, and Browse and yourself spared the scandal as well as the expense of a law-suit. surely his character can not have been so entirely mistaken as his present purpose would...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Nicholas P. Trist, 27 Nov. 1823

Mail after mail has arrived without bringing me a line from you My Dear Nicholas, for more than a month past. have you forgotten me? or are you sick? I assure you that enquiry, which I make of myself every hour in the day without being able to answer, torments me very much. the last letter that I...

Virginia J. Randolph (Trist) to Nicholas P. Trist, 8 Apr. 1824

I expect you have accused me of relapsing into my lazy habits of last Fall, Dearest Nicholas, and I hasten to vindicate myself in the very first moment that belongs to me. The meeting of the visitor’s which was to have taken place as soon as the assembly rose, was postponed until the usual time,...

Virginia J. Randolph Trist to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 27 June 1825

The sight of a letter from my Dearest Sister & brother to day made me feel happier than I thought any thing could have done just now, & the pleasure was partly unexpected as we did not know of the delay which prevented you from reaching Fredericksburg the Steam boat friday evening,...

Pages