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Showing 11 results

Richard Randolph’s Letter “To The Public,” 29 Mar. 1793

To the PUBLIC MY character has lately been the subject of much conversation, blackened with the imputation of crimes at which humanity revolts, and which the laws of society have pronounced worthy of condign punishment. The charge against me was spread far and wide before I received the smallest...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Elizabeth Trist, [ca. 1 Oct.–31 Dec. 1807]

This will be delivered to you My Dearest Friend by Mr. Robertson a young gentleman of uncommon merit and abilities. he is going to reside amongst you in a public capacity and where there is so much bad will be a comfort to your honest republican heart. I did not know untill late in the evening...

Ann C. Morris to William B. Giles, 7 Feb. 1815

I wrote to Mr Eppes a few days ago requesting him to call on you and read the packet which I took the liberty of forwarding, to your care, last week. By this day’s mail I send (in three packages) a copy of my...

Ann C. Morris to William B. Giles, 17 Feb. 1815

I did not intend imposing on your patience again, but, am anxious to know whether all the packages, which I took the liberty of forwarding to your care, reached Washington. If not, I shall obtain another copy of Mr R’s letter, determined it shall be seen in Virginia with a copy of my Answer. It...

Ann C. Morris’s Statement Regarding William B. Giles, 14 Mar. 1815

Early in 1790 I derived an exalted opinion of Mr Giles from an estimable young man by the name of Harrison. At different times I heard of Mr Giles defending me amid the fury of Enemies, not for my sake, because indeed our acquaintance was too slight, but in a way which evinced much benevolence of...

Ann C. Morris to William B. Giles, 22 Mar. 1815

It is unnecessary to describe the amiable Mrs Carrington to one who has ever been acquainted with her. Mrs Randolph (formerly Miss Beverley) is an ornament to human nature. Neither my husband or self can yet call to mind my ever having said Mr Randolph was particularly attentive to me at any...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Elizabeth Trist, 31 May 1815

I believe it is better My Dear Mrs. Trist to let you take my apologies for granted, than to engross a page of the few letters I do write with so uninteresting a subject; and really I could say nothing that ought to excuse a silence of two years. I have been sincerely...

Lafayette to Robert B. Taylor, 21 Aug. 1826

By the time when mr Hall is Returned to Norfolk, we shall Approach the Anniversary day of a Celebration which Has Been Marked With Numberless tokens of kindness to me and with My Very particular obligations to You, my dear general. Nor Can I forget the Reception, So flattering and Affectionate,...

Nicholas P. Trist to James Madison, [5] Oct. 1826

With a caution that my slowness and total inexperience in the duties of which the board of Visitors tender me the discharge, will probably call for a full measure of indulgence; and with the grateful feelings which the mark of confidence is calculated to inspire, I accept the opportunity...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, [ca. 22 Oct. 1826]

I recieved your letter dearest Ellen after a very sick night, occasioned I believe by a walk of about 20 minutes on the terrace, and although it has left me extremely languid, yet as the subject of it will admit of no delay I will try and recall to memory as many of the circumstances which have...

Nicholas P. Trist to James Madison, 28 Oct. 1826

Your letter found me engaged with the papers relating to Mr Jefferson’s memoir. As I could not therefore immediately attend to it without pretermitting these; and as the time for communicating the report was distant enough to admit of a little delay, I contented myself with sending you word,...