Custom Dates

Dates

For instance, 1763-01
For instance, 1888-12
Showing 1 - 25 of 65 results

Pages

Nicholas P. Trist to Elizabeth Trist, 11 Dec. 1808

I have been made extremely happy by receiving your kind letter. Brother and I go to school to Mr Debecour. and at eight O clock every morning we go to Mr Digraises to take our Danscing lessons. It was my Mothers intention to place us under the care of Parson Chase, who promised to take us for...

Nicholas P. Trist to Elizabeth Trist, 25 Sept. 1809

I am very sorry to hear that you are so very sick, I am very glad of the idea of going to New Orleans, Brother gives his love to you and says he tries his best to write to you, I hope you will go to New Orleans with us. give my love to Aunt Harriot if you please, we are now at Aunt Christinas I...

Nicholas P. Trist to Elizabeth Trist, 5 Oct. 1809

Uncle Charles sets of tomorrow for Alexandria, Father and Mother have arrived at N. York, he was very well a week ago, but the gout has attacked him again it flies from his hand to the foot,—I hope Dear Grandmother you will forgive me for my neglect I hope Aunt Harriot will b...

Nicholas P. Trist to Elizabeth Trist, 25 July 1813

The miscarriages of the post I suppose has been the cause of my receiving no news from you for it is three months since I have received any I have had a fever but am now & totally recovered. I hope that you are well in good health as well as all my Dear cousins. The fourth of July was...

Nicholas P. Trist to Elizabeth Trist, 15 Oct. 1813

You may perhaps be surprised at seeing my letter of this date My Mother who is now Madame St Julien Tournillon has been married to a gentleman of that name sent for me to be at the marriage. He is a very amiable man and will send Browse to College with me and I am very happy to find a...

Nicholas P. Trist to Elizabeth Trist, 14 Jan. 1814

I went to Baton rouge the other day & found at the post office two letters from you, one of the 6th Novb for myself and one of the 8th Decber for Browse, which caused us great pleasure as a considerable space of time had elapsed since last we heard from you. You mention in your letter to me...

Nicholas P. Trist to Elizabeth Trist, 14 Jan. 1815

I went to Baton rouge the other day & found at the post office two letters from you, one of the 6th Novb for myself and one of the 8th Decb for Browse, which caused us great pleasure as a considerable space of time had elapsed since last we heard from you. You mention in your letter to me...

Nicholas P. Trist to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 18 Sept. 1818

The probability of an absence of some length, from Albemarle, has induced me, Dear Mrs Randolph, to take a step, which I had, a short time since, resolved to defer until I should have attained my twenty-first year: a step, which if it does not entirely meet your approbation,...

Nicholas P. Trist to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 20 Sept. 1818

any request from my dear Mrs Randolph, could not possibly fail being obeyed by one, who is more proud of her friendship and esteem, than any other mark of distinction which it is in the power of the world to bestow; I shall therefore remain silent, and part from you, cherishing the hope that on...

Nicholas P. Trist to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), [ca. 12–27 July 1821]

The desire of inducing her to “give up her family” is one of the last things I deserved to be suspected of by Virginia, for I knew her well enough to be certain that she would not accede to such a proposal, and she ought to have known me well enough to be convinced that I could not make such a...

Nicholas P. Trist to Virginia Jefferson Randolph, 12 July 1821

The interview I yesterday requested, and for the refusal of which, Hope forbids me to assign any other reason than your maiden modesty, was for the purpose of making a declaration of a passion which, unless my eye is not what the eye generally is “the index of the soul” you must have often read...

Nicholas P. Trist to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), 25 Jan. 1822

Why dont I receive a letter from You?—your last has been written nearly two months; (December 2d); and, but for one I received the other day from Mr Gilmer wherin he mentioned having met Jefferson, and heard from him that you were all well, I should be miserable.—From the knowledge I have of my...

Nicholas P. Trist to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), 27 Apr. [1822]

Our mother is in heaven! she expired in our arms last night before we could get any assistance.—I had not time to promise it to herself, but I have to her angelic spirit that now floats above over me, that you will shall be a mother to her poor little infants.—

Nicholas P. Trist to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), 5 May [1822]

as my dearest friend may suppose, I am in no great mood for writing: it is some relief however, to disburden my heart into that of my better half; especially as I know the sympathetic throb which will have beat in her bosom before this reaches her, and the anxiety she will feel to hear the tale...

Nicholas P. Trist to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), 7 July 1822

You will not think, I know, my beloved Virginia, from my tardiness in answering your two last letters, that my heart has been backward in acknowledging the tenderness that breathes throughout them.— They show me that I am loved as I wish to be;—as I, myself, Love: do not therefore be too...

Nicholas P. Trist to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), 29 July 1822

It is well, my dearest Virginia, you did not wait for a sight of the sun’s “blessed face” before writing, for my indignation had been gathering for three or four weeks, and I had fixed on to-day for pouring it forth— Don’t infer from this that my disposition is an exacting one, in general; it is...

Nicholas P. Trist to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), 11 Aug. 1822

I wish, my dearest Love, I had another letter from you, to answer today, for they are certainly by far my greatest source of pleasure. next comes that of writing to you, and the consciousness that I am preparing pleasure to “her whom I love best on earth”; which you see I indulge in tolerably...

Nicholas P. Trist to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), 12 Sept. 1822

Your last, written more than six weeks ago, informed me of the existing indisposition of several of the family. A “mere circumstance,” how ever, I suppose; since I am indebted, for any alleviation of my uneasiness on the subject, to an “all’s well” in a letter Browse lately got from Francis.—I am...

Nicholas P. Trist to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), 30 Sept. 1822

Though I am labouring under a tolerably bad head ache, the effect of having got so much interested last night, in Stewart’s Philosophy of the human Mind, which I have bega begun to study, as to sit up two or three hours after my usual bed time (11 o’clock); I will not let a mail pass without...

Pages