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Showing 501 - 525 of 608 results

Virginia J. Randolph Trist to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 19 Mar. 1828

Nothing but the determination to write regularly to the dear ones from whom I am separated, could surmount the obstacles that lie in the way of it my dearest sister, and already half of my week to write has slipped away without my having had it in my power to fill the accustomed sheet. to no one...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 24 Mar. 1828

I have many things to say, and but little time to say them in: I will begin therefore with the business part of your letters, it being of more interest to you than any other: Your books on Roman law are on their way to Charlottesville;—the shoes you ordered for Mr Madison have not been sent, for...

Cornelia J. Randolph to Virginia J. Randolph Trist, 30-31 Mar. 1828

I have the head ach, dear Virginia, & do not know whether I can write as long a letter as usual, but will not defer writing as tomorrow I shall be employed all day closely. I read your Louisiana schemes with pain & yet would not say no to them; the abandoning Monticello altogether would...

Thomas Mann Randolph to James Monroe, 1 May 1828

as I never go off of this mountain myself nowadays, since my new abode here, and have no attendant, your truly gratefull and duly honoured favour was very long in geting to my hands. I read your memoir immediately with that...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 2 May 1828

We arrived here at 6 o clock this morning My beloved Ellen after a most prosperous voyage of 18 hours. the swell round Judith’s point soon rendered the lady’s cabin, in which there were at least 20 ladies & 9 or ten children, a most uncomfortable residence, but My old friend ...

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 6 May 1828

Your letter of the 2nd my dearest mother, was joyfully received and relieved me from a portion of those vague apprehensions which always attend me for some time after parting with those I love. I always feel as if there were some ill-defined danger hovering over my absent friends, & am ready...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 7 May 1828]

The bearer Mr Higginson, of Cambridge, is a most excellent and valuable person, who is about visiting Va—has been very well acquainted with mother during her stay here, and one to whom we all wish you to pay every attention in your power.He may be accompanied by Prof. Norton, of Cambridge...

Hore Browse Trist to Nicholas P. Trist, 12 May 1828

I hope your editorial venture may succeed. There is only one objection to it, which would however apply to every other enterprise for making money, that is. The expence is present, the profit future. Does the establishment rest on a solid basis, or is its present prosperity at all dependent on...

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Virginia J. Randolph Trist, 13 May 1828

It is long, dearest Virginia, since I have written to you, because I thought you heard regularly from Mama & Cornelia, & would therefore know all that was interesting to you to know concerning your friends here; but now I shall again make a regular correspondent, for, not for worlds,...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 14 May 1828]

Private! My last letter gave you an a/c of my efforts to engage a printer: I took unwearied pains to procure a suitable person, making very minute inquiries, and in every instance found that they were in vain; those whom I could most confidently have recommended falling away from their...

Edward Livingston to Nicholas P. Trist, 17 May 1828

I am greatly obliged by your kind compliance with my request although you may think I have been in no haste to acknowledge it. this is true, and I have nothing to offer in extenuation but the pressing business in the latter part of a Session, an excuse which might be good circumstances but which...

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 28 May 1828

Your letter dearest mother, relieved me from some anxious thoughts which were beginning to take possession of my mind at not hearing of your arrival at Monticello. Col. Peyton mentioned in his letter to Joseph that you were not very well when you left Richmond, & my fears for your health were...

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Virginia J. Randolph Trist, 24 June 1828

A letter which I received yesterday from Mary, dearest Virginia, gave me the first feeling of anxiety on the subject of Papa’s health. my impression has hitherto been that it was probably a case of dyspepsia (a complaint inherent in the Randolph constitution) & the idea of it’s being at all...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 26 June 1828

Private I have recd your last, June 19: Mary’s had in a degree prepared us for its contents: We are in hourly expectation of hearing from you again—: owing to my absence the your letter was opened by Ellen, who was much distressed, but is now more composed. I thank you for the minuteness of your...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to George Wythe Randolph, 30 June 1828

I should have written to you again My dearest George although you have not answered My first hurried scrawl, but I was so closely confined during the last weeks of your poor father’s illness, that I hardly left his bed side for a moment. and since his death, I had not courage to be the first to...

Nicholas P. Trist to Joseph Coolidge, 30 June 1828

You must not consider the Sentiments on the Hartford conventn contained in last Saturday’s paper, as mine. On all these subjects, as I wd be sure to be overruled I let matters take their own course: and Dr Carr, tho’ a christian i.e. member of the church, and withal a very worthy man, is a real...

Extract from William Short to John H. Cocke, 8 July 1828 [Quote]

I am obliged candidly to own that thus far it has fallen far below my expectations—And I fear that the apprehension (which I always felt to a certain degree, that when its master & creative spirit was gone, it would languish dwindle & decay,) has begun already to be realized. Indeed it...

Extract from William Short to John H. Cocke, 8 July 1828 [Quote]

I have frequently heard Mr Jefferson say that this germ of a fondness for building, was developed in him by the accidental circumstance of his purchasing a book on Architecture, when at College from an old drunken Cabinetmaker who still resided near the College gate in my time & whom I...