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Showing 476 - 500 of 608 results

John C. Page to Martha B. Eppes, 8 June 1827

I intended to call & see you to day, but am obliged another way—The season has arrived for employing Overseers, for the next year, & knowing how important it is that they should be engaged by the person who is to superintend them, I think it best, to know your views & wishes, on the...

Mary J. Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 11 June 1827

your letter arrived my dear Sister just as I was preparing to spend this evening in writing to you and in addition to the pleasure of hearing from you again after so long a silence, ( & even mama has neglected us of late) I am rejoiced to have an opportunity of answering it immediately...

George Wythe Randolph to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 13 June 1827

I want to see you very much and I hope I shall in the couse course of a very short time I am beginning to get accustomed to the place from my knowing all the boys at it. and the next letter you wite write I want to know some thing about my going to the south in it. I wish you would send me that...

Cornelia J. Randolph to Virginia J. Randolph Trist, 24 June 1827

I have just heard dear Virginia that Mrs Faulcon (Louisiana Cocke) was going to Albemarle and that she would take letters for us; I am very much tired already with writing I am terribly sleepy but cannot lose so good an opportunity. I would write to Mary but Mary Cary intends to do so, tell her I...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 28 June 1827

My anxiety about the choice of a mathematical professor has led me to ask many questions, of late, of Mr Farrar, and from him I learn that Mr Munroe has written to President Kirkland, desiring him to name any individual whom he thinks peculiarly qualified for the situation: he (Mr Farrar,) also...

Hore Browse Trist to Nicholas P. Trist, 12 July 1827

Your letter to S. B—Came to hand yesterday, & releived us from some anxiety, which an intermission in writing, on your part, unusually long, had given rise to—It was with heartfelt satisfaction that we found you health to be better instead of worse. You have fine times of it, with your...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 18 July 1827

I hoped to have heard, this morning, the result of the Trustees meeting—: who is the successful candidate? is it Walker? Since writing in his favor I have heard that Harker and Nulty probably were competitors; there can be no doubt that these men, as mathematicians, are far before Walker—; but...

Mary J. Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 29 July 1827

it is so long since I have written to mama or yourself my dear Sister that I can scarcely recollect to which of you this letter is due, according to my rule of writing alternately to each of you, but I believe it was to mama that I addressed my last letter. we went up to Monticello Saturday week...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 17 Aug. 1827]

I have your letter of Aug 1.many are the complaints which I have made against you, but your pardon is accorded:—so many things occur to me which I should be glad to say to you that I am at a loss to begin—take some of them as they arise. I am glad that you stood upon points with Key —; he is one...

Cornelia J. Randolph to Virginia J. Randolph Trist, 13 Sept. 1827

Mr Gilmer was obliged to stay one day here my dearest Virginia & that gives me an opportunity of writing to you which I will do if it is only to tell you how much I have thought of you all since I left you; every thing else I suppose Martha has told you for she was going to write to you...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 14 Sept. 1827

I have only time to write a single line, (more or less) to enclose the power of attorney to Jefferson. it is difficient in the recital of the act of legislature which I did not possess nor was a copy of it to be found in Boston. but perhaps if Jefferson has actually received the stock which I...

John Ramsay to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 29 Sept. 1827

I have the honor to acknowledge the rect of your letter from Cambridge, with the accompanying power of Attorney, which I am happy to say, will enable me to bring the buisiness of the stock to a speedy close; when the proceeds shall be placed, in the Branch Bank...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 5 Oct. 1827]

I have done all in my power to make Gilmer’s stay here pleasant—but you well know how impossible it is for a man to see any thing properly in a day or even a week where there are so many things to call his attention at the same moment. He was accompanied by a Mr Wellford, of Fredericksburg, who...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 16 Oct. 1827

I write to you at the particular desire of Mr Sparks, who has been for two years in vain trying to obtain copies of letters (5 or 6 in number.) written by Mr J. to Ledyard the traveller, in the years 1785., 1787. & 1788—: these have been promised him by Jefferson, but have never been recd—and...

William Wirt to Dabney Carr, 27 Oct. 1827

It is an old saying you know that a blacksmith’s mare and a shoe-maker’s wife are generally the worst shod animals in the Parish—& it is certainly true that my dearest friends are the worst-treated of my correspondents—for strangers will not bear to have their letters neglected—& friends...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 5 Nov. 1827

I have yours in answer to mine respecting Mr Sparks’ application: Thank you for your immediate attention to my request: it is creditable to us both. Sparks sails for England in Decr early: his life of Ledyard will be read by every body here; in it there are many things favourable to Mr Jefferson...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [ca. 10 Nov. 1827]

I have this day put aboard the Brig Levant, for Richmond, on yr. a/c, the address of Bernard Peyton, sundry articles, viz an oil Cask; and cannister; a box of Sperm. candles; & a small box—marked N. P. T.—in the same vessell are 32 small kegs; containing best, and freshest white lead, just...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 26 Nov. 1827

I have been long waiting for the Brig William from Richmond to arrive that I may receive the books &c which are aboard her; but tho. two months have passed since she left Rd we have no news of her, and she must either have been blowed off, or lost in the late tremendous gales:—the truth is...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 4 Dec. 1827

I begin with your p.s. to the letter from Mary.—The lamps will please you and wear well. only remember the directions I gave you respecting the manner of using them: Jeff’s lead is warranted of the best quality, and I know it to be the freshest in the place. Jones is it seems appointed: I have no...

Robley Dunglison to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 5 Jan. 1828]

My wife, I am happy to think, is something better this morning, although her complaint still Continues—she decidedly is not worse. Mrs Gorman unfortunately does not suit us; she is weak & what is worse so overpowered by her distressed situation that she is rendered totally unfit to wait upon...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 3 Mar. 1828]

I have the pleasure to introduce to you Dr. Lieber; his name is already known to you, having been mentioned in former letters of mine: He came to this country to establish a Gymnasium and swimming school in Boston, and has done so with full success; Dr Lieber has also given lessons in German to...

Thomas Mann Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 11 Mar. 1828

My circumstances & state of health being afflicted with that Gout, or Rheumatic affection of the stomach which attacked me in August 1826, and state of Mind so influenced by no very pleasing associations with Monticello during the last short interval of my residence there, almost constant...