Elizabeth Trist to Nicholas P. Trist

My Dearest Nicholas

For very dear you are to me; so much do you occupy my thoughts, that I can not be happy without I hear from you at least once a month, your last letter was dated the 23d of Feby you then complaind of continuel headackes but attributed it to want of exercise and the weather has not been favorable for taking any out of doors tho the ground has been dry enough for walking or riding on Horseback but the Ruts are deep in places so much so that it is dangerous in many places for a carriage that and the high winds that prevail generally this month have I presume been the cause of my not seeing any of the Monticello family except Mr Jefferson who came san ceremony on Saturday last and took dinner with us, it began to rain about 5 Oclock tho not hard but he cou’d not be prevaild on to stay all night as he expected some of the visitors of the University that evening or next day but it seems but four assembled two of the members were too unwell to leave home Mr Jefferson I never saw look better I was afraid that he wou’d take cold that evening he left here for he wou’d not take an umberella fortunately it did not rain hard and by the time he got to Charlottesville it ceased raining, he brought1 me a letter from Virginia date 30th March, she complain’d of having had a bad cold which prevented her writing sooner her Mama had just recoverd from another attack of bad head ache brought on as usual by cold and if this weather continues she fears that she will have another attack as she is not cautious enough in avoiding the cold air, Mann accompanied his Father to Richmond and got leave of absence renewd but had not been home three days before he received orders to the Hornet which was to sail on the 27th for Florada and Havanah expected to return in 6 weeks Mr Jefferson will pay his Spring visit to Bedford this month Cornelia is going certainly, but they had not decided which of the Remaining three will accompany her, as each puts in her claim, she shou’d not be surprised if her Mama was to go up, indeed if her Aunt Eppses Harpiscord is sent she will be obliged to go to put it in tune Mr Sully the great portrait painter who was employ’d by the institution at W Point to take a full length likeness of her Grand Papa left them the day before after succeeding most admirably with his painting she says it is certainly the best likeness she ever saw, she mentiond that Manns notice to join the Hornet she just heard was so short that she saild before he cou’d reach her, and will return home immediately—I have rec’d three letters from your Brother since I recd your last he wrote on the 24th March to request me to let him know what it was that cured Mr Jefferson of the cutanious complaint that he brought with him from the Springs as Mr Gaillard who lodges in the same House with him as been afflicted with it some time and cant get rid of it, was curious to know by what treatment Mr Jefferson removed it, by chance he has got acquainted with many of my relations as he calls them Betsy Stretch Mrs Van Wyke and her daughter who he seems much pleased with and intends placing her at the head of the list, and call her his fair Cousin he has also visited Old Mrs Howell as he calls her another Mrs Howell a daughter in law and Mrs Jones all my relations and all he says are Quakers, but unless they are much alterd since I saw them they are not very plain or strict Quakers, Betsy Stretch desired him to inform me that Mrs Perot was at the Point of Death which I am very sorry to hear for she is an amiable woman he says that his own health has become good but he feels some uneasiness about you but hopes the spring will Renovate you he says I need not be under any apprehension about his being careless in his expences when he keep no accounts but pays ready Money for all he gets in proportion as his purse gets low he becomes particular and when it gives out, of course there is a stop—his letter of the 26th is only to inform me that he has recd a remittance from his good Father and a 150$ for me but he was at a loss how to convey it to me. fortunately Mr Heiskill a son in law of Jessey Lewis who keeps a Store in Staunton has gone to Philad to lay in his goods his family are at Mr Lewiss till his return which will be in a month or five weeks I wrote to Browse by him and desired him to send the Money by him, as he observes it will not arrive “Mal a propos2 for I am reduced almost to my last Dollar. Your Grand Mother Brown and your Mother were not well I presume that you have Recd letters also and remittances, pray My Dear Child take care of your health and let me beseech you to inform me if you continue to have those bad head aches be careful of what you eat and use the lancet if you are too full of blood it may be a Rhumatick pain, I have it almost constantly but the weather will admit of your taking exercise I have not yet heard from Bedford the particulars of Mr Burwells Will it had not been opend when your Cousin wrote on the 14th of last Month but I was glad to hear that he was not left sole executor John Burwell Saml Cooke and Peachey Gilmer Peachey is left Guardian to his son with surprise I heard he has disposed of his Negroes in the same manner General Washington did, they are to be free perhaps after a certain time Mr Divers has been afflicted with his old complaints pain in his head &cc the rest of the family are as well as usual and send their respects to you let me hear from you and dont deny me the only pleasure or rather the greatest pleasure I can enjoy. may God bless and preserve you many years is the fervent prayer of your affectionate Grand Mother

E. Trist
(DLC: NPT); addressed: “Mr Nicholas. P—Trist West Point State New York”; postmarked Charlottesville, 10 Apr.; endorsed by N. Trist: “April 5th 1821.”
1Manuscript: “brought brought.”
2Closing parenthesis editorially replaced with closing quotation marks.