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Showing 351 - 375 of 490 results

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Virginia J. Randolph Trist, 20 Mar. 1827

Four weeks have nearly elapsed since I received my dear Virginia’s letter which I meant to have answered sooner, but have had not a moment’s leisure. (as usual.) for my life is a very troublesome one & my time so frittered away in little occupations & interruptions that I have scarce a...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ann C. Morris, 22 Mar. 1827

It appears doomed that I am always to begin every letter to you dear Nancy with an apology. I should have written to you as soon as I heard through Mr Wadsworth of Gouverneur’s illness, but I was my self confined to my bed at the time. My health although greatly improved is still delicate, and I...

Etienne St. Julien de Tournillon to Nicholas Philip Trist, 10 Apr. 1827

Votre lettre du 11. ul., m’a confirmé dans L’opinion que j’avais que Vous ne m’aviez pas oublié: j’aime à croire que Vous me Supposez toujours la même affection pour vous et pour tout ce qui Vous est cher; et que, Si notre correspondance n’a pas cette activité qui caractèrise celle De Deux...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 18 Apr. 1827

Yours of March 26. gave me great pleasure:—I mean the hearing from you gave me pleasure, for you give me rather a discouraging picture of your own health and spirits. I feel sorry that you are so completely in the Dr’s hands, for tho I think well of Dunglison, yet I think ill of too much medicine...

Cornelia J. Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 22 Apr. 1827

I have been just a fortnight at this place my dear Sister, during which I have received one letter from Tufton but though the girls promised faithfully to forward all your letters and mama’s to me during my absence, it is now nearly four weeks since I have had a word of intelligence from you in...

Cornelia J. Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 18 May 1827

I have found it absolutely impossible to write before this, dear sister, we have been so busy lately, to day we have come up to have the bedding sunned & house aired &c &, & I will try to accomplish getting a letter finished in the odd times while I am hear here, though I do not...

Charles Cramer’s Account of a Visit to Monticello, [before 26 May 1827]

Charlottesville—82 miles from Richmond, is celebrated as the Seat of Jefferson College or the University of Virginia. This institution owes its origin to the Late Thos Jefferson former president of the U. St. who devoted the latter part of his ever active life, towards the promotion of Science ...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 1 June 1827

At length I date from this place, dear to me from many causes:—as the scene of years of great happiness, and as arising in my mind recollections of Cambridge in England, where I passed the pleasantest hours spent abroad.We effected our removal, here, without difficulty, and are delightfully...

John C. Page to Martha B. Eppes, 8 June 1827

I intended to call & see you to day, but am obliged another way—The season has arrived for employing Overseers, for the next year, & knowing how important it is that they should be engaged by the person who is to superintend them, I think it best, to know your views & wishes, on the...

Mary J. Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 11 June 1827

your letter arrived my dear Sister just as I was preparing to spend this evening in writing to you and in addition to the pleasure of hearing from you again after so long a silence, ( & even mama has neglected us of late) I am rejoiced to have an opportunity of answering it immediately...

George Wythe Randolph to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 13 June 1827

I want to see you very much and I hope I shall in the couse course of a very short time I am beginning to get accustomed to the place from my knowing all the boys at it. and the next letter you wite write I want to know some thing about my going to the south in it. I wish you would send me that...

Cornelia J. Randolph to Virginia J. Randolph Trist, 24 June 1827

I have just heard dear Virginia that Mrs Faulcon (Louisiana Cocke) was going to Albemarle and that she would take letters for us; I am very much tired already with writing I am terribly sleepy but cannot lose so good an opportunity. I would write to Mary but Mary Cary intends to do so, tell her I...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 28 June 1827

My anxiety about the choice of a mathematical professor has led me to ask many questions, of late, of Mr Farrar, and from him I learn that Mr Munroe has written to President Kirkland, desiring him to name any individual whom he thinks peculiarly qualified for the situation: he (Mr Farrar,) also...

Hore Browse Trist to Nicholas P. Trist, 12 July 1827

Your letter to S. B—Came to hand yesterday, & releived us from some anxiety, which an intermission in writing, on your part, unusually long, had given rise to—It was with heartfelt satisfaction that we found you health to be better instead of worse. You have fine times of it, with your...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 18 July 1827

I hoped to have heard, this morning, the result of the Trustees meeting—: who is the successful candidate? is it Walker? Since writing in his favor I have heard that Harker and Nulty probably were competitors; there can be no doubt that these men, as mathematicians, are far before Walker—; but...

Mary J. Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 29 July 1827

it is so long since I have written to mama or yourself my dear Sister that I can scarcely recollect to which of you this letter is due, according to my rule of writing alternately to each of you, but I believe it was to mama that I addressed my last letter. we went up to Monticello Saturday week...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 17 Aug. 1827]

I have your letter of Aug 1.many are the complaints which I have made against you, but your pardon is accorded:—so many things occur to me which I should be glad to say to you that I am at a loss to begin—take some of them as they arise. I am glad that you stood upon points with Key —; he is one...

Cornelia J. Randolph to Virginia J. Randolph Trist, 13 Sept. 1827

Mr Gilmer was obliged to stay one day here my dearest Virginia & that gives me an opportunity of writing to you which I will do if it is only to tell you how much I have thought of you all since I left you; every thing else I suppose Martha has told you for she was going to write to you...