Custom Dates

Dates

For instance, 1763-01
For instance, 1888-12
Showing 1 - 25 of 287 results

Pages

Maria Jefferson (Eppes) to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 3 June 1792

Mrs Pine set off this morning to England I staid with her till a day or two before she went and am now with papa and hope to be for some time I expect to go then to mrs Brodeau. I have heard that she is a very agreeable woman and that all her scholars are very fond of her Papa intends to go to...

Maria Jefferson Eppes to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 1 Apr. 1798

I must again write to you my Dear Sister tho’ a painful doubt has sometimes arrisen, whether, or not, it is agreeable to you; & as much as I have endeavor endeavour’d to find reasons for your silence I can imagine none that could for so long a time, have occasion’d it. I was sorry to hear...

Nicholas P. Trist to Elizabeth Trist, 11 Dec. 1808

I have been made extremely happy by receiving your kind letter. Brother and I go to school to Mr Debecour. and at eight O clock every morning we go to Mr Digraises to take our Danscing lessons. It was my Mothers intention to place us under the care of Parson Chase, who promised to take us for...

Elizabeth Trist to Mr. Kelly, 27 Mar. 1809

I may have acted improperly in the request I made to you Mr Randolph being the only person authorised to transact any business relating to my in this country and thro him the application shou’d have certainly...

Elizabeth Trist to Elizabeth Kortright Monroe, 3 Apr. 1809

I am really feeling some delicacy at what I am about to exact from you as I know it will be attended with some trouble to you but your kind offer to execute my little commissions imboldens me to put your freindship to the test once more to get me a plain high posted mahagony bedstead with railing...

Nicholas P. Trist to Elizabeth Trist, 25 Sept. 1809

I am very sorry to hear that you are so very sick, I am very glad of the idea of going to New Orleans, Brother gives his love to you and says he tries his best to write to you, I hope you will go to New Orleans with us. give my love to Aunt Harriot if you please, we are now at Aunt Christinas I...

Nicholas P. Trist to Elizabeth Trist, 5 Oct. 1809

Uncle Charles sets of tomorrow for Alexandria, Father and Mother have arrived at N. York, he was very well a week ago, but the gout has attacked him again it flies from his hand to the foot,—I hope Dear Grandmother you will forgive me for my neglect I hope Aunt Harriot will b...

Lucy Eppes Thweatt to Martha B. Eppes, 28 Dec. 1809

On my return last evening from Eppington I found my dear Sisters letter it gave me great pleasure as every proof of her affection will ever do, Sincerely do I regret my absence from home when it arrived, I fear you have experienced...

John Wayles Eppes to James Thruston Hubard, [ca. 1810]

our little boy is I hope much better though too un well still for Martha to leave him. This circumstance would have prevented her visiting you today & will deprive her of that pleasure tomorrow— We shall be very glad to see you & Mrs Hubard on any day when you can come over—accept for her...

Ann C. Randolph Bankhead to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 2 Feb. 1810

I am very sorry My Dear Mama That Jefferson has given you so bad an account of Mary & one that she does not deserve at all. it is true she was not as good then as she was before & has been since but I attributed it to their teasing her so much you know what a tease...

Samuel House to Elizabeth Trist, 6 Apr. 1810

After a long silence for which I am ashamed, I have to Apologize to you for such neglectful behaviour, I again went down to enquire after the health and happiness of my Dear Aunt, as such an opportunity offers which I readily embrace, & hope you will forget past negligence, If I promise,...

Elizabeth Trist to Nicholas P. Trist, 3 June 1810

I, was delighted my Dear Nicholas at the receipt of your letter which was a testimony of your remembrance as also of your application to your duties, which from your Mothers Lamentation for the loss you had sustaind in the Death of your Father and her inability to pay the attention you required,...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 7 Jan. 1811

I am afraid My Dr friend that I shall tire your patience by forcing so many of my scribbles upon you, but goodness often wounds it self—had you been less kind and discovered less feeling towards a distressd unfortunate family you might have escaped as well as many other of my acquaintance with...

Nancy Simms to Elizabeth Trist, 7 Jan. 1811

I recd my beloved Friends letter from Montecello a few days after its date, you say you were detained by the lameness of one of Mr Gilmers Horses and as the weather has for some time been very unfavourable to travelling—I have some hopes that this letter will find you still at Albemarle—I should...

James Nelson Barker to Elizabeth Trist, 24 Feb. 1811

Many thanks dear Madam—But justice loses nothing by mercy and were I guilty my compunctions would only be increased by your kindness. My excuses may have been awkwardly made but that must not rob my assertions of their sincerity; and as I am desirous of more than partial belief I would fain...

Lucy Eppes Thweatt to Martha B. Eppes, 19 Mar. 1811

Changed indeed my dear Sister is our habitation by the absence of you all, I fear Matilda will not remain content she has been so gloomy that I have felt quite uneasy about her. Mr Thweatt has been constantly absent & only her & my self, she appears lost—we have a continuance of Perkins’s...

Maria Sabina Ross to Elizabeth Trist, 20 Jan. 1812

How often have I exclaimed, Why my friend this long silence, to suppose You had forsaken me was too injurious to Yourself and painful to me, Sometimes I would say, I judge her by myself for my dearest friend has become indifferent to me, but Your kind, and affectionate favor has awaked every...

Caroline House to Elizabeth Trist, 12 May 1812

Except my thanks dearest Aunt for your obliging favour, believe me to hear from you is one of the greatest pleasures I enjoy. I often peruse your letters with sentiments of affection mingled with respectful sympathy for your sorrows and admiration at your fortitude they likewise leave a sadness...

Pages