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Showing 651 - 675 of 735 results

David M. Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 24 Mar. 1820

’Tis now about 4 weeks since I received the pamphlets which you were so good as to send me, which I read with pleasure, long may the sentiments expressed it in continue to animate the bosoms of Americans, the case of the Cadets was exactly that of America before the revolution, their grievances...

Etienne St. Julien de Tournillon to Nicholas P. Trist, 24 Mar. 1820

La Lenteur que j’ai mise, L’année dre a Vous envoyer Vos fonds a dû vous faire Soupçoner que j’étais comme tant d’autres dans une disette d’Espèces qui, ici comme ailleurs, ne Se fait malheureusement que trop Sentir. le produit, de nos récoltes quoiqu’abondantes, nous Laisse à peine de quoi...

Etienne St. Julien de Tournillon to Nicholas P. Trist, 24 Mar. 1820

La Lenteur que j’ai mise, L’année dre a Vous envoyer Vos fonds a dû vous faire Soupçoner que j’étais comme tant d’autres dans une disette d’Espèces qui, ici comme ailleurs, ne Se fait malheureusement que trop Sentir. le produit, de nos récoltes quoiqu’abondantes, nous Laisse à peine de quoi...

Elizabeth Trist to Nicholas P. Trist, 28 Mar. 1820

It is hardly worth the expence of Postage that you pay for my letters, but it is some satisfaction when I dont receive letters from my friends to write to them; I dont mean to complain of your not writing, tho it is six weeks and upwards since the date of your last, as your Brother, in a note...

Elizabeth Trist to Nicholas P. Trist, 28 Mar. 1820

It is hardly worth the expence of Postage that you pay for my letters, but it is some satisfaction when I dont receive letters from my friends to write to them; I dont mean to complain of your not writing, tho it is six weeks and upwards since the date of your last, as your Brother, in a note...

Martha B. Baker to Martha B. Eppes, 30 Mar. [1820?]

I have anxiously look’d out for a letter from you or from some of my friends at Mill Brook, this is the second to you & no answer, your situation I have attributed my not hearing from you to & be assured make every excuse I can, before I allow myself to suppose my being...

Martha B. Baker to Martha B. Eppes, 30 Mar. [1820?]

I have anxiously look’d out for a letter from you or from some of my friends at Mill Brook, this is the second to you & no answer, your situation I have attributed my not hearing from you to & be assured make every excuse I can, before I allow myself to suppose my being...

Elizabeth Trist to William W. Gilmer, 4 Apr. 1820

Your Cousin Browse came to see me yesterday and inform’d me of the event that your letter announced, I was much surprised not having had a hint that any thing so important was in expectation Aunt Divers...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to James Madison, 11 Apr. 1820 [Quote]

Our brewing for the use of the present year has been some time over. about the last of Oct. or beginning of Nov. we begin for the ensuing year, and brew malt and brew 3. 60 galln casks successively, which will give so many successive lessons to the person you send. on his return he can try his...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to William Short, 13 Apr. 1820 [Quote]

among the sayings & discourses imputed to him by his biographers, I find many passages of fine imagination, correct morality, and of the most lovely benevolence: and others again of so much ignorance, so much absurdity, so much untruth, charlatanism, and imposture, as to pronounce it...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to William Short, 13 Apr. 1820 [Quote]

But while this Syllabus is meant to place the character of Jesus in it’s true and high light, as no imposter himself, but a great Reformer of the Hebrew code of religion, it is not to be understood that I am with him in all his doctrines. I am a Materialist; he takes the side of spiritualism: he...

Hore Browse Trist to Nicholas P. Trist, 14 Apr. 1820

I am in doubt whether or not I answer’d your last letter, but be assured that I feel sensible of your kindness, & that I duly appreciate the motives which induce you to remain although I am so much the loser by the act itself: for I hold your improvement and advancement as the first...

Hore Browse Trist to Nicholas P. Trist, 14 Apr. 1820

I am in doubt whether or not I answer’d your last letter, but be assured that I feel sensible of your kindness, & that I duly appreciate the motives which induce you to remain although I am so much the loser by the act itself: for I hold your improvement and advancement as the first...

Mary Trist Jones Tournillon to Nicholas P. Trist, 20 Apr. 1820

I received a polite and affectionate letter from Lewis Livingston announcing his intention of visiting New York and appearing to be the bearer of any thing I wish to send you, I have asked him to take charge of the triplicate of that bill for one hundred and fifty dollars if mr Duhey? has not...

Mary Trist Jones Tournillon to Nicholas P. Trist, 20 Apr. 1820

I received a polite and affectionate letter from Lewis Livingston announcing his intention of visiting New York and appearing to be the bearer of any thing I wish to send you, I have asked him to take charge of the triplicate of that bill for one hundred and fifty dollars if mr Duhey? has not...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to John Holmes, 22 Apr. 1820 [Quote]

but this momentous question, like a fire bell in the night, awakened and filled me with terror. I considered it at once as the knell of the Union. it is hushed indeed for the moment. but this is a reprieve only, not a final sentence. a geographical line, coinciding with a marked principle, moral...

Ellen W. Randolph (Coolidge) to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 18 May 1820

I have been in Richmond a week to day my dear Mother, and two posts have past without my hearing from home. Elizabeth and Virginia received letters to day from Harriet, but she says nothing of the Monticello family, & I wh I am beginning to be very anxious to hear from you all. Aunt Hackley...

Ellen W. Randolph (Coolidge) to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 18 May 1820

I have been in Richmond a week to day my dear Mother, and two posts have past without my hearing from home. Elizabeth and Virginia received letters to day from Harriet, but she says nothing of the Monticello family, & I wh I am beginning to be very anxious to hear from you all. Aunt Hackley...

Cornelia J. Randolph to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), 19 May 1820

I reciev’d your letters yesterday My Dear Virginia while writhing under one of those infernal pains, & with the horrors of being oblig’d to sleep that night in a room full of girls, for Mrs Carr & her daughters were expected last evening on their arrival from Baltimore; she is to spend...

Cornelia J. Randolph to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), 19 May 1820

I reciev’d your letters yesterday My Dear Virginia while writhing under one of those infernal pains, & with the horrors of being oblig’d to sleep that night in a room full of girls, for Mrs Carr & her daughters were expected last evening on their arrival from Baltimore; she is to spend...

Hore Browse Trist to Nicholas P. Trist, 30 May 1820

You have the boldness to say that I am in your debt to a considerable amount of epistolary specie, whereas, I am well convinced, if all accounts were settled between us, the balance would be in my favour. no doubt you find it some what more irksome to write a letter than to read one, and for that...

Hore Browse Trist to Nicholas P. Trist, 30 May 1820

You have the boldness to say that I am in your debt to a considerable amount of epistolary specie, whereas, I am well convinced, if all accounts were settled between us, the balance would be in my favour. no doubt you find it some what more irksome to write a letter than to read one, and for that...