Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache

My Dear Friend

I shou’d have embraced an earlier opportunity to make my acknowledgements for your kind favor by Jefferson Randolph but being on a visit to Mrs Monroe it did not reach me till the day before yesterday I beg you to accept my sincere thanks for your polite and friendly invitation and the unexpected proof of the Docters goodness in offering to be our escort is indelibly fix’d on my mind, be assured that it wou’d give me pleasure to see you both once more; but I feel a repugnancy in visiting my native place which may appear very extraordinary to you I have had most pressing invitations from some of my relations which I have withstood from a belief that I shou’d feel more sensibly my misfortunes there than any where else no home that I can call my own no tender Mother or affectionate child to receive me, the very Idea is such a pang to my heart that I am incapable of expressing my self as I wou’d wish but you can enter into my feelings at the same time I must confess that I have a great desir[e] to see Philad independent of friends who I shou’d be glad meet, the improvements that has taken place since I left it wou’d amuse and gratify me and I undoubtedly will endeavour to conquer the reluctance I feel if Mary can not come here, and meet her there, in her last letter of the 18th ult she does not dispare of visiting Albemarle she says if Phils strength will admit of his taking such a journy they will come poor fellow how great has been his sufferings the last two years Mary seems to think that when he recovers from the Gout he will enjoy good health but I much fear that his constitution is so injured that he will never be a hearty man tho his life may be prolongd a few years at the expence of misery to him self and the destruction of his wifes constitution I certainly feel interested in his existance his kindness to my Grand Sons has endeard him to me indeed he has always treated me with respect and attention and I shou’d want gratitude if I did not love him—but upon the terms he has held his existance for some time past I shou’d look upon death a blessing. Harriet arrived at Monticello from Farmington since I left there yesterday two weeks we have been very little together while I was at Farmington She was on a visit to Lucy Gilmer that was, now Minor Peachy and Polly with their children spent part of the winter in this Neighbourhood but the season was so bad that we had little intercourse I was stationary six months at Mr Divers I have experienced the greatest kindness and hospitality from all my friends but I think it is not as agreeable as when we all lived here they consider your family and ours leaving the Neighbourhood a loss at least they say so, and I am willing to believe them Mrs Bankhead some days ago was delivered of a Son it was not expected till next month tis a very small child for a day or two after its birth they had little hope of its living but it begins to thrive and she is quite hearty Mr Jefferson and Mrs Randolph paid us a visit yesterday which gave me an opportunity of presenting your remembrance to them they are both very well and Monticello looks charmingly since the House is finnish’d Mrs Monroe goes to Richmond the latter end of this month to be with her daughter at the awful period of maternity I wish that she may go her time out, she has frequent and violent attacks of cramp in her stomach in other respects very hearty and very happily situated Mr Hay is one of the most tender and affectionate husbands greatly attach’d to her and she to him, one of the best establishments in virgina with flattering prospects of prosperity in short she says that she has not a wish ungratified if her Parents where only near her I have scribbled to the end of my paper which warns me to conclude after after assurances of my regard for yourself and family who I have never ceased to remember excuse inaccuracies which my letters are allways replete with and believe me affectionatly

your friend
E, Trist
RC (PPAmP: Catherine Wistar Bache Papers); addressed:“Mrs Cathrine Bache Philadelphia”; stamped; postmarked Milton, 11 July; endorsed by Bache: “Mrs Trist July 1811.”
Recipient
Catharine Wistar Bache
Date Range
Date
July 10, 1809
Collection