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Showing 76 - 100 of 140 results

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to William Short, 5 May 1816 [Quote]

you propose a more Quixotic task in the reformation of what may be deemed defective in our constitution. no, my dear friend; nothing could allure me again into the furnace of politics. while engaged in the various functions of the government, duty required me to go straight forward, regardless of...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Milligan, 13 Apr. 1819 [Quote]

the nation, and especially the wealthier portion of it which is in possession of our legislature the function of legislation, is unfortunately in willing bondage to the snares & seductions of this the painted harlot of banking bubbles and there can be no remedy but by setting their minds to...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to Spencer Roane, 6 Sept. 1819 [Quote]

each of the three departments has equally the right to decide for itself what is it’s duty under the constitution, without any regard to what the others may have decided for themselves under a similar question.But you intimate a wish that my opinion should be known on this subject. no, dear Sir....

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to Joseph C. Cabell, 22 Jan. 1820 [Quote]

all the states but our own are sensible that knolege is power. the Missouri question is for power. the efforts now generally making thro’ the states to advance their science is for power, while we are sinking into the barbarism of our Indian aborigines, and expect like them to oppose by ignorance...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to James Monroe, 20 Mar. 1820 [Quote]

this Missouri question by a geographical line of division is the most portentous one I have ever contemplated. King is ready to risk the union for any chance of restoring his party to power and wriggling himself to the head of it. nor is Clinton without his hopes nor scrupulous as to the means of...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to William Short, 13 Apr. 1820 [Quote]

Altho’ I had laid down, as a law to myself, never to write, talk, or even think of politics, to know nothing of public affairs & therefore had ceased to read newspapers. yet the Missouri question arroused and filled me with alarm. the old schism of federal & republican, threatened nothing...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to Jacob De La Motta, 1 Sept. 1820 [Quote]

Th: Jefferson returns his thanks ... for the eloquent discourse on the Consecration of the Synagogue of Savannah ... it excites in him the gratifying reflection that his own country has been the first to prove to the world two truths, the most salutary to human society, that man can govern...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to Thomas Ritchie, 25 Dec. 1820 [Quote]

if there be anything amiss therefore in the present state of our affairs, as the formidable deficit lately unfolded to us indicates, I ascribe it to the inattention of Congress to it’s duties, to their unwise dissipation & waste of the public contributions. they seemed, some little while ago...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to Albert Gallatin, 26 Dec. 1820 [Quote]

nothing has ever presented so threatening an aspect as what is called the Missouri question. the Federalists compleatly put down, and despairing of ever rising again under the old division of whig and tory, devised a new one, of slave-holding, & non-slave-holding states, which, while it had a...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to Spencer Roane, 9 Mar. 1821 [Quote]

The great object of my fear is the federal judiciary. that body, like Gravity, ever acting, with noiseless foot, & unalarming advance, gaining ground step by step, and holding what it gains, is ingulphing insidiously the special governments into the jaws of that which feeds them. the recent...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to Adamantios Coray, 31 Oct. 1823 [Quote]

the equal rights of man, and the happiness of every individual are now acknoleged to be the only legitimate objects of government. modern times have the signal advantage too of having discovered the only device by which these rights can be secured, to wit, government by the people.