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Showing 1126 - 1150 of 1154 results

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Bennett Taylor, 10 Jan. 1865

your letter of 1st Jan. to Mr Coolidge is received. We have heard nothing farther of the exchange, but in such matters, delays are so unavoidable, that we still hope for success. Nothing will be wanting on our part to ensure it. I have heard nothing lately from our friends, except that a letter...

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Bennett Taylor, 17 Feb. 1865

your letter of the 9th has been received. You had not then got Mr C–s enclosure, the answer to our representative, Mr Rice and the few words added by himself. Matters do not look very hopeful for your exchange. yet I hope on, and remember that “relief is often nearest when it appears at the...

Charlotte R. Robinson to Bennett Taylor, 18 Feb. 1865

I heard yesterday that quite a number of Officers had left Johnsons Island last Saturday & again last night some passed through here. I do not know that it is true. I presume you would have written to me if you had been amongst the number. I went last Monday to ask Mrs Trist to write to Mr...

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Bennett Taylor, 21 Feb. 1865

My son Algernon received a letter from my brother Jefferson, yesterday, dated 3d February, perhaps even later news than you have received. All well. I write principally to say that I feel to-day more encouraged in the matter of your exchange than I have done yet. Mr C. who has been unremitting in...

Charlotte R. Robinson to Bennett Taylor, [4? 7?] Mar. 1865

Mrs Emley & myself returned from Washington last night. Gen. Hancock who is the principal person there for the arrangement of the exchange of prisoners promised us, to have you, & Lieut: Moncure, sent from Johnsons Island amongst the first that are now to leave. I am sorry I could not go,...

Jane H. Nicholas Randolph to Lucy Colston Taylor, 2 Aug. 1865

I offered my congratulations to Bennett this morning, & I cannot sleep to night without tendering the same to you my dear Lucy (as I hope you will allow me hereafter to address you) on the happy relation in which you stand to each other Bennett will tell you that I have loved him more than...

Sarah N. Randolph to Cornelia J. Randolph, 7 December 1865

Your letter was received not quite a fortnight ago. We had been wondering that you did not write, as you had said in your letter to sister Ellen that you were going to write and you had never answered my letter sent you by Algernon last summer. It is no wish of ours that our intercourse should...

Will of George Wythe Randolph , 14 Dec. 1866

I George W Randolph of the State of Virginia do make & publish this as my last Will hereby revoking all former Wills made by me at any time, 1st I wish my just debts paid 2nd I give to my wife for life the silver plate given me by my brother Jefferson and my sister Mrs Coolidge and at her...

Henry S. Randall to James Parton, 1 June 1868

The D “Dusky Sally story—the story that Mr Jefferson kept one of his slaves (Sally Hemmings) as his mistress & had children by her, was once extensively believed by respectable men, & I believe both John Quincy Adams & our own Bryant sounded their poetical lyres on this very poetical...

Will of Cornelia J. Randolph, 10 Nov. 1869

I Cornelia Jefferson Randolph, being of sound and disposing mind, do make, publish & declare this to be my last will and testament, writing the same wholly with my own hand. 1st My just debts, if I leave any, are to be paid. 2nd All my property of any & every kind, real, personal or mixed...

Virginia J. Randolph Trist to Virginia Randolph Burke, 1 Mar. [ca. 1880]

You have been sadly neglected my darling children, since Poor Harry’s illness. We felt so anxious & unhappy about him that no one had the heart to write. Now he is improving steadily & sent his love to every body in his mother’s last letter. She is charmed with the whole family of Jone’s,...

Martha J. Trist Burke’s “Relics from ‘Monticello,’” 9 Aug. 1888

Relics from “Monticello” 1st The old french clock supported between black marble Obelisks. This clock was brought from France by Thomas Jefferson, and stood always near the head of his bed on a wooden bracket which is at Edgehill. When the sale of Mr Jefferson’s personal property took place at ...