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Showing 26 - 50 of 68 results

John Wayles [Hemings] Jefferson to Beverly [Hemings] Jefferson, 9 Mar. 1862

PATRIOT WAR CORRESPONDENCE. From the Eighth Regiment. LETTER FROM MAJOR J. W. JEFFERSON. Camp—in the Swamp, near Sikestown, Mo.}March 9, 1862. Dear Brother:—We have been in the swamp just a week to-day. We were ordered away a week ago, with two days’ rations, to Charleston, Mo. As the road was in...

Robert G. H. Kean to Mary E. A. Pope Randolph, 17 Nov. 1862

I dont know what Jane wrote to you about the General’s resignation, so being here at my office, my work over and nothing to do for an hour, except to wait to see whether my new master Genl Smith (“Sec of War ad interim” an office of the Presidents creation) has any commands for me, I feel too...

Extract from the Autobiography of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge, 1863

1863 General McClellan passed some days in the beginning of February in Boston. He was most enthusiastically received by the people. There was a monster reception at the Tremont House of fifteen thousand people. He received a silver pitcher from the children and a sword from the Citizens’...

James Bancroft to William E. Eppes, 3 Feb. 1863

Yours of 27th Ult. came duly to hand—Lizzie says two letters were recd from you for me when I was sick, if I ever hear’d of them before I had entirely forgottan all about it, looking in drawers &c I have found one of the 20th Decr there is something in it about Money and Dr Henderson—now in...

John Wayles [Hemings] Jefferson to Beverly [Hemings] Jefferson, 21 May 1863

I hasten to drop you this line; I cannot write much, as I have no time or spirits. Since the 2nd of May up to yesterday (excepting two days I was in Jackson, Miss.,) I have been continually on the March and fighting the rebels. I had not until to-day changed my clothes or had a decent meal for...

Bennett Taylor to John C. R. Taylor, 9 July 1863

I write to let you know that I am well, tho’ wounded Slightly, and a prisoner, I was not So much disabled, but that I could have walked off if I had been a little quicker. I wrote to my aunt the other day, but a very general letter, letting her know my condition &, that you were all well at...

J. S. Nicholas to John C. R. Taylor, 16 July 1863

Capt Bennett Taylor of the 19th virginia Regiment is well, & slightly wounded in the side, & wishes these facts known to his friends at home in Virginia. He is presumed to be, or to have been recently in Baltimore as a prisoner; but as intercourse with prisoners is not allowed, it is not...

A. C. T. to John C. R. Taylor, 1 Aug. [1863]

My husband received your letter today, requesting him to inquire for your Son Bennett. As he is on a parole it will be my pleasure to assist you in any way I can—I learned a week ago, that your Son was in the battle, and I immediately wrote a friend to search for him—The restrictions at that time...

Henry Gantt to John C. R. Taylor, 22 Sept. 1863

I was very glad to hear from you that there was a probability of Bennetts being exchanged—I have written to Commissioner Ould & stated to him that Bennett was my Senior Capt & how important it was to the Regt at this time to have his services. I truly hope the exchange may be effected ...

Extract from the Boston Daily Advertiser, 29 Sept. 1863

Major Coolidge.—Major Sidney Coolidge, of this city, reported to have been killed at Chattanooga, is, we understand, a prisoner supposed to be wounded. He was second in command of the regulars under Brig.-General John H. King.

Extract from the Boston Daily Advertiser, 12 Oct. 1863

Major Coolidge.—We are sorry to learn that while it seems probable that Major Sidney Coolidge of the Sixteenth United States Infantry was wounded and taken prisoner at Chickamauga, his friends are still without that specific intelligence which would make it certain that he survived that terrible...

Extract from the Autobiography of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge, 1864

1864 During this year the war continued in all its force, but we were gradually breaking down the Confederate strength and preparing for their surrender in April, 1865. The financial condition of the country became appalling, gold reaching at one time two hundred and seventy-six, and the English...

Francis Eppes to Edmund Wilcox Hubard, 4 Mar. 1864

In my hurried retreat from the ‘old homestead,’ I omitted to procure the description boundaries &c of the Lot whc I sold to My sister Eliza, and as you are her agent in business matters, I write to inform you of the cause of delay in forwarding as promised, the relinquishment of Dower. Send...

Francis Eppes to Eliza Eppes, 21 Mar. 1864

I was rejoiced to hear from Mary a few days ago that you are much improved in health, and I trust that this will find you at Saratoga, enjoying that quiet and freedom from household duties, so essential to one in yr. enfeebled condition. It is the one thing needful for you my dear Sister; the one...

Nicholas W. Eppes to Eliza Eppes, 23 Mar. 1864

I am going to make one more effort to revive our correspondence, which I hope will be more sucessful than those through the past winter. It seems as though some unwonted fate had attended every effort to acquaint my dearly loved relatives of Mill Brook, with my whereabouts, since I have been...

Cornelia J. Randolph to Elizabeth Rivinus, 7 June 1864

(Copy) The three accompanying letters of my Grandfather, sent, in compliance with your request for autographs for exhibition at the Fair, are the only ones in my possession here; all my other memorials of him are in Virginia, “beyond the Union lines”—soon, I trust, to be within them without...

Francis Eppes to Maria J. Eppes (Shine), 20 July 1864

Well my ever dearest Maria, you are at last (if we may credit Fanns letter) safely mor moored in the haven of yr. hopes! and enjoying the pleasant company of yr. hospitable friends; and in anticipation the renovating influences of the salubrious & invigorating clime to whc you have flown. You...

Account of the Sale of Monticello, Buck Island, and Slaves, 25 Nov. 1864

THE SALE OF MONTICELLO. A correspondent of the Lynchburg Republican sends that paper an account of the sale of Monticello, the former residence of Thomas Jefferson. It was sold under the confiscation act. The letter says a large crowd was present, and— “Among them was Captain Jonas P. Levy,...