Custom Dates

Dates

For instance, 1763-01
For instance, 1888-12
Showing 26 - 50 of 102 results

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 7 Mar. 1822

I shall not apologise for keeping your letter 3 weeks by me unanswered, exact punctuality is not in my power, fortunately perhaps for my correspondants. as you did not receive the Louisville packet in due season I am almost sorry that my part of it at least had not gone to the bottom, for old...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 21 Mar. 1822

I beg My dear Nicholas that you will never again suffer your self to be made seriously uneasy by any possible length of silence from me. I am so notorious an offender in that way that if you did but know it, I deserve thanks and praises at your hands so far, for having treated you to so much...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ann C. Morris, 27 May 1822

I received your last some weeks before I left Monticello, but I believe you are so much accustomed to my bad ways that you do no require a fresh apology for every letter—I have in vain tried to be punctual but bad habits are not so easily...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 1 July 1822

I should not have waited for Your letter My very dear Nicholas to have written to you, could My mind have suggested one solitary argugment of comfort. time alone, can soothe the heart, and all that the strongest reason can do, is to assist its operation by attention to the physical as well as...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 1 Sept. 1822

No apology is due to me Dearest Nicholas for any delay in answering my letters, who have now before me two of yours unanswered. It is really a singular circumstance that loving you, and thinking of you as much as I do, I should still be so much under the influence of a habit contracted in early...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ann C. Morris, 3 May 1825

When your last letter arrived I was confined by a severe illness which has prostrated my small stock of strength and denied me the power of replying to it earlier—I have a perfect recollection of the letters from Mr Hamilton which you sent for my perusal and which were returned to you—I was much...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ann C. Morris, 8 Aug. 1825

I could never make you understand my dear Sister how impossible it is for me to be punctual, without any laziness on my part. but you have been kind enough to give me credit for my good intentions and wave all ceremony in writing your self, for which I am most grateful. we have allways a great...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 1 Sep. 1825

I must write to you My dear Ellen, when I can, and not wait for time to do it quietly and rationally. I have literally not one quiet hour from 5 in the morning my usual hour of rising, till 10 at night, when we generally retire. the odd half hours and quarters that I can command I will most...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 18-19 Sept. 1825

I wrote a hurried scrawl to Mr Coolidge by the last mail which would have been burnt if I had had time to collect my thoughts to do better, but although I went in to Nicholas’s pavillion and it rained furiously while I was there, I was so often interrupted, and even forced to leave My letter to...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 16 Nov. 1825

I have only time to write you a few lines My dearest Ellen, to prevent a longer silence than usual and which might alarm you. I recieved Your letter last monday was a week, and would have answered it with in the same week, but the next mail mail brought one from Col. Peyton informing us of the...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 26 Nov. 1825

We have just despatched a box containing such a ridiculous heterogeneous collection, that even you will smile when you unpack it. to begin with the principal article of the catalogue, and which in fact obtained transportation for the rest, is the writing desk for Joseph which I mentioned in a...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ann C. Morris, 22 Jan. 1826

I have not written for a long time My dear Sister because in truth I had nothing but painful subjects to communicate. the unfortunate event of the sale I have long anticipated not altogether however to the extent it has gone. the property has fallen very far short of the payment of the debts. it...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Joseph Coolidge, 1 Mar. 1826

No apology is due My dear Joseph for the earnestness with which you urge Cornelia’s visit. believe me you can not be more anxious about it than I am, and I hope we shall be able to accomplish it without resorting to the means you propose. not that my heart does not admit...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ann C. Morris, 1 May 1826

Thank you dear Sister for your kind letter. This sad winter is gone, but the misfortunes which have marked it’s progress are as irremediable in themselves as the recollection of them will be lasting and bitter. Mr Bankhead’s conduct has been extremely kind and proper; he has given me the most...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, [ca. 22 Oct. 1826]

I recieved your letter dearest Ellen after a very sick night, occasioned I believe by a walk of about 20 minutes on the terrace, and although it has left me extremely languid, yet as the subject of it will admit of no delay I will try and recall to memory as many of the circumstances which have...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ann C. Morris, 4 Dec. 1826

I was extremely Mortified dear Sister at having past through New York without seeing you as I had intended. but we were detained so long in Baltimore by a violent cold and sore throat that I had, that we were obliged to come on as rapidly as possible that Jefferson might return immediately. as it...