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Showing 226 - 244 of 244 results

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Mary J. Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 24 Feb. 1829

brother Jeff came home last night & my first enquiry of course was about “the morals of Christ” which I had sent you, (not knowing if I was doing right or wrong) he did not mean that it should have...

Thomas Jefferson Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 6 Mar. 1829

Ben has returned but the waggons are still out and loaded with plaister from Fredericksburg which I think I shall regret. Poor James is infinitely worse and if some change does not take place can not hold long. Ben brings us the report of the death of Young Lee ...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 22 Mar. 1829

I have this moment recd your letter. What an excellent plan has been entirely defeated! of course it is of no avail to mourn now, but it seems to me unaccountable that having been compelled by his necessities to sell the books J. did not take the only steps in his power to make them produce...

Thomas Jefferson Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 13 Apr. 1829

I think the books had best be sent to Philadelphia. which is the only city in the union which has a numerous class of Literary persons who would buy rare books: this class in Boston is less numerous and less wealthy than in Philadelphia (the wealth being great in the hands of a few). in...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 16 July 1829

I wish you to forward the accompanying packet to Jefferson, wherever he may be, only taking care that it reach him safely, and without delay. I hope soon to have time to write to you;—the books have arrived at last, but more of them...

Hore Browse Trist to Nicholas P. Trist, [ca. 3 Aug. 1829]

I have Just received yr last and the enclosed about the Advocate. un homme sans le sou. You had better come as soon as possible,—There have been some applications for books & the applicants are put off until your arrival Mr Van Buren will return to day. & there will be perhaps something...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 22 Sept. 1829

I have yours of 16 Sept. The numbers of the books sent me are as follows; viz, nos 17. 19. 24. 28. 32. 33. 41. 56. 82. 88. 138. 200. 186. 187. 168. 242. 375. 434. 443. 449. 463. 469. 483. 530. 531 722. 723. 724. 727. 728. 793. 816. 822 822. 918.—I caution you against Poor—he has twice failed...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 16 Oct. 1829

It was so late monday evening when I received your letter that it was impossible to answer it by that mail. but Jefferson wrote to Col Peyton by the next to forward 100$ and I intended writing by the same to you to let you know what I had done; but was detained by company till too late which was...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 26 Oct. 1829

Our journey has been or rather will be delayed one day at Jefferson’s desire. he was going to Nelson court from which he did not expect to return till tuesday evening, and he wished particularly to be here when we set off. of course we shall not get off go till wednesday when we shall go to Col....

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 2 May 1830

a letter from Ellen recd last night speaks of the possibility of her remaining in washington until an answer to it could arrive from me; at the same time that it intimates she may decide to return to Boston without delay; in which case the present would not find her, and might be retd to her,...

Thomas Jefferson Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 15 Feb. 1831

I was much surprised at the information contained in your letter and do not hope much from it. We ought to keep the most perfect silences upon the subject and as much aloof as possible. Yet no attempts will be made to defeat it by exciting suspicions of fraudulent management in the affairs of...

Thomas Jefferson Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 4 Apr. 1832

After a hard contest in which every combination of fraud & force have been put to trial against me I have been re elected by 95 votes proclaiming my self on the hustings The “avowed & unflinching advocate of abolition.” I suspected Mr Gilmer of having been sent by Tazewell & Gordon ...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 6 Mar. 1838

My Boy has arrived safe, and many thanks to you, and dear Virginia, for your care of him: to this, and the change of climate, we probably owe his life; and, after he has been turned out loose, to run wild, as a colt, in the Albemarle hills, I firmly count on his becoming in time a Man! I have...

Virginia J. Randolph Trist to Nicholas P. Trist, 26 May 1839

Faithful to my promise, dearest —, I shall spend an hour every Sunday in writing all my childish recollections of my dear grandfather, which are sufficiently distinct to relate to you. My memory seems crowded with them, and they have the vividness of realities; but all are trifles in themselves,...

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