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Showing 126 - 139 of 139 results

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Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 2 May 1830

a letter from Ellen recd last night speaks of the possibility of her remaining in washington until an answer to it could arrive from me; at the same time that it intimates she may decide to return to Boston without delay; in which case the present would not find her, and might be retd to her,...

Thomas Jefferson Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 15 Feb. 1831

I was much surprised at the information contained in your letter and do not hope much from it. We ought to keep the most perfect silences upon the subject and as much aloof as possible. Yet no attempts will be made to defeat it by exciting suspicions of fraudulent management in the affairs of...

Thomas Jefferson Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 4 Apr. 1832

After a hard contest in which every combination of fraud & force have been put to trial against me I have been re elected by 95 votes proclaiming my self on the hustings The “avowed & unflinching advocate of abolition.” I suspected Mr Gilmer of having been sent by Tazewell & Gordon ...

Nicholas P. Trist to Andrew Jackson, 18 Dec. 1835

On my way to the Steam boat at Baltimore, yesterday morning, I called at the post-office, where I found your kind passport to the confidence of your friends in the Southern country. I do not expect to have any time for making acquaintance with any body in my route; but I shall feel more...

Andrew Jackson to Meriwether Lewis Randolph, 6 July 1836

Congress having, at last, adjourned it gives me a moment to acknowledge your letter of the 8th of May last—This I would have done sooner but I was waiting information from home, of what had been done, if any thing, with my the studs, before I could reply to this part of your letter—I am still...

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Andrew Jackson, 27 Nov. 1837

My brother, Mr Trist, has suggested to me that you might possibly read with pleasure a little work on the Abolition Question by a lady of this State—a copy of which I had lately sent to him. It is, we think, worthy of praise for it’s mild and christian spirit, it’s correct statement of facts, and...

Nicholas P. Trist to Andrew Jackson, 15 June 1840

I hope soon to have a breathing spell, in which to write to you—My victory will be such as never was seen before: no, not even at New Orleans.—Great as the confidence of my friends in my character may be, they even cannot form the remotest conception of the strength of my position. How it defies...

Nicholas P. Trist to Andrew Jackson, 1 Dec. 1842

How long it is since I have written to you! You will not, however, I am sure have distrusted on that account the fidelity of my attachment; or ever supposed for a moment that I did not often think of you, and always with warm affection. Wherever I might be, and under whatever circumstances, you...

Cornelia J. Randolph to Elizabeth Rivinus, 7 June 1864

(Copy) The three accompanying letters of my Grandfather, sent, in compliance with your request for autographs for exhibition at the Fair, are the only ones in my possession here; all my other memorials of him are in Virginia, “beyond the Union lines”—soon, I trust, to be within them without...

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