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Showing 101 - 125 of 145 results

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 18 July 1827

I hoped to have heard, this morning, the result of the Trustees meeting—: who is the successful candidate? is it Walker? Since writing in his favor I have heard that Harker and Nulty probably were competitors; there can be no doubt that these men, as mathematicians, are far before Walker—; but...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 17 Aug. 1827]

I have your letter of Aug 1.many are the complaints which I have made against you, but your pardon is accorded:—so many things occur to me which I should be glad to say to you that I am at a loss to begin—take some of them as they arise. I am glad that you stood upon points with Key —; he is one...

John Ramsay to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 29 Sept. 1827

I have the honor to acknowledge the rect of your letter from Cambridge, with the accompanying power of Attorney, which I am happy to say, will enable me to bring the buisiness of the stock to a speedy close; when the proceeds shall be placed, in the Branch Bank...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 5 Oct. 1827]

I have done all in my power to make Gilmer’s stay here pleasant—but you well know how impossible it is for a man to see any thing properly in a day or even a week where there are so many things to call his attention at the same moment. He was accompanied by a Mr Wellford, of Fredericksburg, who...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 16 Oct. 1827

I write to you at the particular desire of Mr Sparks, who has been for two years in vain trying to obtain copies of letters (5 or 6 in number.) written by Mr J. to Ledyard the traveller, in the years 1785., 1787. & 1788—: these have been promised him by Jefferson, but have never been recd—and...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 5 Nov. 1827

I have yours in answer to mine respecting Mr Sparks’ application: Thank you for your immediate attention to my request: it is creditable to us both. Sparks sails for England in Decr early: his life of Ledyard will be read by every body here; in it there are many things favourable to Mr Jefferson...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [ca. 10 Nov. 1827]

I have this day put aboard the Brig Levant, for Richmond, on yr. a/c, the address of Bernard Peyton, sundry articles, viz an oil Cask; and cannister; a box of Sperm. candles; & a small box—marked N. P. T.—in the same vessell are 32 small kegs; containing best, and freshest white lead, just...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 26 Nov. 1827

I have been long waiting for the Brig William from Richmond to arrive that I may receive the books &c which are aboard her; but tho. two months have passed since she left Rd we have no news of her, and she must either have been blowed off, or lost in the late tremendous gales:—the truth is...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 4 Dec. 1827

I begin with your p.s. to the letter from Mary.—The lamps will please you and wear well. only remember the directions I gave you respecting the manner of using them: Jeff’s lead is warranted of the best quality, and I know it to be the freshest in the place. Jones is it seems appointed: I have no...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 3 Mar. 1828]

I have the pleasure to introduce to you Dr. Lieber; his name is already known to you, having been mentioned in former letters of mine: He came to this country to establish a Gymnasium and swimming school in Boston, and has done so with full success; Dr Lieber has also given lessons in German to...

Thomas Mann Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 11 Mar. 1828

My circumstances & state of health being afflicted with that Gout, or Rheumatic affection of the stomach which attacked me in August 1826, and state of Mind so influenced by no very pleasing associations with Monticello during the last short interval of my residence there, almost constant...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 24 Mar. 1828

I have many things to say, and but little time to say them in: I will begin therefore with the business part of your letters, it being of more interest to you than any other: Your books on Roman law are on their way to Charlottesville;—the shoes you ordered for Mr Madison have not been sent, for...

Thomas Mann Randolph to James Monroe, 1 May 1828

as I never go off of this mountain myself nowadays, since my new abode here, and have no attendant, your truly gratefull and duly honoured favour was very long in geting to my hands. I read your memoir immediately with that...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 7 May 1828]

The bearer Mr Higginson, of Cambridge, is a most excellent and valuable person, who is about visiting Va—has been very well acquainted with mother during her stay here, and one to whom we all wish you to pay every attention in your power.He may be accompanied by Prof. Norton, of Cambridge...

Hore Browse Trist to Nicholas P. Trist, 12 May 1828

I hope your editorial venture may succeed. There is only one objection to it, which would however apply to every other enterprise for making money, that is. The expence is present, the profit future. Does the establishment rest on a solid basis, or is its present prosperity at all dependent on...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 14 May 1828]

Private! My last letter gave you an a/c of my efforts to engage a printer: I took unwearied pains to procure a suitable person, making very minute inquiries, and in every instance found that they were in vain; those whom I could most confidently have recommended falling away from their...

Edward Livingston to Nicholas P. Trist, 17 May 1828

I am greatly obliged by your kind compliance with my request although you may think I have been in no haste to acknowledge it. this is true, and I have nothing to offer in extenuation but the pressing business in the latter part of a Session, an excuse which might be good circumstances but which...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 26 June 1828

Private I have recd your last, June 19: Mary’s had in a degree prepared us for its contents: We are in hourly expectation of hearing from you again—: owing to my absence the your letter was opened by Ellen, who was much distressed, but is now more composed. I thank you for the minuteness of your...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 9 July 1828

Having just finished writing a note of introduction to Mess. Davis, Trist & Co for Mr Clark, the printer, I determine to reply to those parts of your late letter, which call for a particular answer: In the first place you ask me how many copies of Long’s book upon ancient geography you would...

Thomas Jefferson Randolph to Andrew Jackson, 20 Oct. 1828

I have taken the liberty of presenting to your notice my young friend Mr Wills who has been engaged in copying the M.S.S. of my late grandfather Mr Jefferson, and is now procuring subscribers for their publication. I have ventured to take this liberty, from the knowledge of the friendship which...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [ca. Dec. 1828]

A long time has passed without my writing to you, and several events occurred of so much interest to yourself that I have been on the point, again and again, of sending a line (for I had not time nor thought for more,) to tell you of the pleasure it gave me to hear that you had obtained a...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 2 Jan. 1829

I see that Mr J’s books are to be sold in Washington: by the recommendation of my friends, I wish you would send on Catalogues for distribution: any, Member of Congress, not exceedingly conscientious, will frank the packet for you: they...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 11 Feb. 1829

I write to you on the subject of the books; my will consist of two parts: those contained in the former I wish you to purchase for me at all events; those in the latter may depend upon circumstances.let me promise that your decision of the articles wh. I should want, at the sale of furniture ...

Thomas Jefferson Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 16 Feb. 1829

The books are all packed I hope securely and well altho not in order: they were put in according to size very much. paper on the bottom & back, and a slip between each. and as tight as possible to prevent friction. I am afraid to trust them down the river and as the distance to the steam boat...