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Showing 376 - 400 of 506 results

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 28–29 May 1828

Your letter dearest mother, relieved me from some anxious thoughts which were beginning to take possession of my mind at not hearing of your arrival at Monticello. Col. Peyton mentioned in his letter to Joseph that you were not very well when you left Richmond, & my fears for your health were...

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Virginia J. Randolph Trist, 24 June 1828

A letter which I received yesterday from Mary, dearest Virginia, gave me the first feeling of anxiety on the subject of Papa’s health. my impression has hitherto been that it was probably a case of dyspepsia (a complaint inherent in the Randolph constitution) & the idea of it’s being at all...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to George Wythe Randolph, 30 June 1828

I should have written to you again My dearest George although you have not answered My first hurried scrawl, but I was so closely confined during the last weeks of your poor father’s illness, that I hardly left his bed side for a moment. and since his death, I had not courage to be the first to...

Nicholas P. Trist to Joseph Coolidge, 30 June 1828

You must not consider the Sentiments on the Hartford conventn contained in last Saturday’s paper, as mine. On all these subjects, as I wd be sure to be overruled I let matters take their own course: and Dr Carr, tho’ a christian i.e. member of the church, and withal a very worthy man, is a real...

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge: Personal Note, 13 July 1828

July 13. 1828 Looking at the date of my last “outpourings” I find them as far back as June 15. I have had abundant thoughts which it would have relieved me to communicate to these papers, at present my most confidential friends, but I have too little leisure for such communion. to day an ...

Mary J. Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 20 July 1828

Nicholas somewhat exaggerated the matter my dear sister when he said that we all complained of your silence, it is true that mama murmured at the plan of writing but once a fortnight & seemed to think she could not so readily submit to use economy in this particular instance, as she could in...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 21 July 1828

Every unkind feeling has been buried in the grave of the sufferer; no longer an object of terror or apprehension, he became one of deep sympathy, or rather commiseration and kind feeling; and affection it self could not have watched with more attentive and patient kindness over every motion or...

Joseph Coolidge to Martha Jefferson Randolph, Aug. 7 [1828]

To any one else I should feel it necessary to begin my letter with an apology, but I have such confidence in your affection, and reasonableness, as to hope that you will excuse my seeming negligence when I frankly tell you that knowing Ellen wrote regularly, I have not forced my thoughts from the...

Mary J. Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 10 Aug. 1828

our late dinner has scarcely left me time I fear my dear Sister to despatch a letter to you before it grows dark, but having defered writing till evening, I have no alternative between making the best use of the little day light that is left me now, & infringing on the morrow morning, which...

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 19 Aug. 1828

It is late in the morning of Tuesday, dearest mother, and I should not attempt to write, as I dislike so much to be hurried in writing to you, but having in my last mentioned Ellen’s illness I thought you might be anxious to hear again. she is very much better, but still pale & thin; I...

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Virginia J. Randolph Trist, 3–4 Sept. 1828

I wrote to Mary only yesterday my dearest Virginia, but as I have half an hour this morning, & Cornelia comes next in the regular turn, I shall put you to the expense of an extra eighteen-pence, in order to reply to yours of the 27th Aug. which I have just received. I feel the more inclined...

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 28 Oct. 1828

I have been most anxiously expecting a letter for some time past, my dear mother, that I might hear something more of this appointment of Nicholas’s. Burwell wrote me that Mr Clay had named him to a place worth $ 1600. a year, but from you I have heard not one word, and know not how to account...

Joseph Coolidge to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 29 Dec. 1828

At 8 oClock this morning, (Decr 29,) Ellen gave me a Son!—They, the mother and child, are both perfectly well: her troubles were not quite so speedily over as in the case of Bess, but they did not last long (not half an hour,) and were not of a very distressing kind: She has been well through the...

Joseph Coolidge to Martha Jefferson Randolph, [1 Jan. 1829]

I doubt not your anxiety to hear from our new comer will make a letter welcome altho. it dates but two days after the one announcing his first arrival: Ellen is quite well, and her infant—although he did make his appearance three weeks too soon is thriving—being what mrs Christian calls “an...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, [ca. 1829]

I was just preparing to answer a letter from Joseph which to my infinite regret arrived a week after Susan had left us when I received yours announcing poor old Mrs Coolidge’s death. few, perhaps I may say none, who had seen so little of her as I did, will regret her more sincerely. on her own...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Joseph Coolidge, 25 Jan. 1829

Your letters are always most welcome dear Joseph whether “two days” or two months should have intervened between them. they do not require the additional recommendation of containing a bulletin of the new comer and his dear mother’s health grateful as that must allways be to me, to make them very...

Joseph Coolidge to Thomas Jefferson Randolph, 10 Feb. [1829]

The Trustees of the Atheneum understanding from me that a large collection of pamphlets existed at Monticello, belonging to Mr Jefferson, have desired me to inquire what you proposed to do with them; And, if for sale, what is their value. I ventured to tell them that I presumed they would be sent...

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Virginia J. Randolph Trist, 13 Mar. 1829

I sometimes fear, dearest Virginia, that you will all imagine, that I have become perfectly stupid, such miserable trash do I send you once in two weeks, to let you see that I am alive, & well in bodily health at least, my letters are written under such disadvantages that nothing but a...