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Showing 51 - 75 of 478 results

Thomas Mann Randolph to Joseph C. Cabell, 23 Mar. 1810

Your letter of yesterday making known your willingness to present yourself as a Candidate for the Senate immediately gives me great satisfaction. I am in the first place gratified in a public matter of very great importance; for most certainly I should without hezitation if the election rested on...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Elizabeth Trist, 12 Nov. 1811

I am truly obliged to you my Dear Friend for having written to me with out waiting for my answers in truth it is impossible for me to be regular in my correspondance with any one. I am at this moment writing in the room with 4 of the children chattering around me, and it is always the case more...

Ellen W. Randolph (Coolidge) to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 30 Mar. [1814]

A slight indisposition which serves as an excuse for me to withdraw from the hurry and bustle in which I live, for the short space of a few hours, gives me an opportunity to write to you; the dinner bell is ringing but I have obtained leave to dine in my own room, and the time which would...

Ellen W. Randolph (Coolidge) to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 24 Apr. 1814

After a fortnights silence my dear mother I have taken up my pen to address you & my letter go by the very stage in which I expected to have gone up myself; I am beginning to get weary of Richmond, or rather of the dissipated life I lead at present, I have never a moment to employ in ...

Will of Peter Carr, 14 Jan. 1815

(copy) In the name of God—Amen. I Peter Carr of Albemarle do make this last will in manner and form following 1st It is my desire that all my debts be paid with all convenient expedition: This as to my debts generally: with respect to those two, due to my Sister Cary, and sister Mary, it is...

Thomas Jefferson Randolph to Jane H. Nicholas Randolph, 10 July 1815

Upon my arrival here I found my affairs so deranged in consequence of my not coming up on saturday that It will be necessary for me to return by the head of Rock fish, a neighbor which abounds in distilleries and whiskey drinkers, Nogs & tories. this will place Charlottesville, almost...

Ellen W. Randolph (Coolidge) to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 5 Jan. 1816

Phill is just leaving town my dearest Mother and I detain him a few moments untill I can write f a few lines to let you know that we arrived safe last evening. the first days journey was a very disagreable one, the roads rough and the carriage a very uneasy, one at Goochland Court, house where we...

Ellen W. Randolph (Coolidge) to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 22 Jan. 1816

I arrived here yesterday morning after a most disagreable & fatiguing journey. We left Richmond friday morning at four o clock, and reached Fredericksburg at eleven o clock at night, having travelled sixteen miles after dark, the roads dreadfull. the second day’s journey was only fifty miles...

Edward Govan to Dabney C. Terrell, 4 Feb. 1816

Your letter came safely to hand I have paid all your debdts as far as the money wil go Dr Foulk and Sam brought in larger bills than I expected. Machir has not the money he owes you but he will get it soone. that will pay all but the 5 for the diploma. I will get the diploma and Machir will take...

Ellen W. Randolph (Coolidge) to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 7 Feb. [1816?]

You will percieve my dear mother that the enclosed letters were written, to send by Mr Carr; he has been leaving Washington every day for more than a week and I was so foolish as to keep my letters for him instead of sending them by the post. I am afraid not hearing from me for such a length of...

Dabney C. Terrell to Martha J. Terrell, 1 Mar. 1816

I received your most affectionate letter a few day before I left Baltimore and should have answered it immediately, but as I had writen to Aunt Carr a few days before I thought it would be better to write to you from the Capes. We left Baltimore 5 days ago and on account of adverse winds have...

Wilson Cary Nicholas to Thomas Jefferson Randolph, 24 Mar. 1816

For the first week after the Birth of your daughter Jane was uncommonly well, she then had a fever for twenty four hours, after which it left her—& she has been since threatened with sore breasts. This evening the Doctor says she has a smart fever & thinks she has caught some cold. She...