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Showing 26 - 50 of 479 results

Caroline Tufton (Barham) to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), 24 Sept. 1789

I have this moment received your letter and take the first opportunity of thanking you for it, and am afraid you will still be set out before this reaches you, you cannot imagine how sincerely we all lament your departure to America, for my part it seems as a fresh seperation, for while you were...

Elizabeth Tufton to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), 23 Oct. 1789

I have just received my dear Miss Jefferson’s kind letter which surprized very agreeably as I had seen some time ago in the newspapers, that you were at Cowes, we have frequently thought of you since, imagining you were on the sea by this time—I do not think we shall be wrong in our conclusions—I...

Thomas Mann Randolph (1741–93) to Thomas Mann Randolph, 1 Dec 1789

It was not my intention, when I wrote to you last, to offend you, disgust you, or even to give you any uneasiness even, for a moment but I find, from a paragraph in your letter: which I shall not quote to you; and to your leaving Tuckahoe in a hurry, and in bad Weather and going still Farther...

Caroline Tufton (Barham) to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), 19 Dec. 1789

It is impossible for me to express how much pleasure your kind letter gave me, which I intended to have answered last month, but was unfortunately prevented, I was quite unhappy to think you were in England without a possibility of our meeting, but I am now in expectation of hearing of your safe...

Bridget Hawkins Roper-Curzon to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

I was most extremely concern’d to find by a letter I received from Botidoux, that my dear Jefferson had been so much indisposed—illness has prevented my writing to inquire after you—but though I have hitherto been silent on that head, I trust you will easily credit the assurance of my having been...

Bridget Hawkins Roper-Curzon to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

Though I wrote to My Dear Jefferson but last Post, Yet I avail myself of a leisure moment, to thank her for a very friendly letter I received yesterday, & for the trouble she has so kindly taken to procure me a Cloak & etc—Believe me my dear Girl, I am truly sensible of the many marks of...

Bridget Hawkins Roper-Curzon to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

I am sensible my Dr Jefferson does not think it a trouble to oblige a friend therefore trust she will excuse ye liberty I am going to take in requesting she will execute ye following commissions for me: will you send for Mlle Bertrand & enquire what skins are ye most in fashion for Pelises, ...

Bridget Hawkins Roper-Curzon to Martha Jefferson Randolph, [ca. 1789]

I am extremely obliged to My Dear Jefferson, for the trouble she has taken about my Cloak—there is one part of her letter I do not perfectly understand, I will transcribe it—l’angola n’est pas tout a fait aussi beau, mais beaucoup moins cher et plus durable que le Cigne—I imagine you mean exactly...

Caroline Tufton (Barham) to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

I am very much obliged to you for the ring, which I shall value for your sake and I never will part with it. I am much hurt not to see you once more before we go, but Mr Jefferson likewise told the Duke it was better not, so we must submit: the waiscoat with the enclosed note is from the Duke, he...

Elizabeth Tufton to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), 1 Feb 1790

My dear Miss Jefferson cannot conceive how impatient we are to hear of her having had a pleasant passage & being safely arrived in America, we begin to apprehend you have accused us of negligence in not writing last month, you will see by the date of the enclosed that is not the case, it was...

Elizabeth Tufton to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 21 March 1790

On my arrival here, I was most agreeably surprized in receiving a letter from you, for to own the truth I began almost to fear new connexions and friends had entirely obliterated in my dear Mrs Randolph the remembrance of one who not withstanding the distance which seperates us, will always feel...

Bridget Hawkins Roper-Curzon to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 14 Apr 1790

I have expected a letter from My Dear Jefferson, for several months, with the most anxious impatience, but I am resolved to render my conviction subservient to my wishes, and to believe that anything rather than loss of health, or want of affection to your friend, have occasioned your long...

Thomas Mann Randolph to Thomas Mann Randolph (1741–1793), Oct. 1790

Immediately on receiving your letter I sent my servant back to Monticello for the Memo of the agreement between you & Mr Jefferson, which I had left not thinking I shd want it. The journey cannot be performed in less than 4 days & at the expiration of that time it shall be returned to you...

Caroline Tufton (Barham) to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 21 Mar. 1791

You cannot imagine my dear Mrs Randolph, how happy I was to hear from you, particularly as it was so long since I had written, that I began to fear you had either you had either never received my letter, or that you had quite forgot me; for though I was very glad to hear you were so happily...

Thomas Mann Randolph (1741–93) to Thomas Mann Randolph, 26 Feb 1792

Ben Hughes, I suppose, will write to you by this Opportunity, giving an Acct of your Affairs at Varina, which are distressing as to the Crop, and Stock—not Corn enough for the Use of the Farm, 700 bushels of Wheat not Merchantable & refused by Boyd & Ker, but they have, by my Advice...

Thomas Mann Randolph to Thomas Mann Randolph, 17 Jan 1793

I find that the payments I have made to you will just about discharge my debt to you on open account and therefore propose that they should be applied to liquidate this instead of being against my first bond. I send you a copy of the account as complete as I can draw it before I see Mr Hughes,...

Thomas Mann Randolph to Joseph Watkins, 1 Feb. 1796

By the breaking of my carriage the first half mile of the journey I am baulked in my intention of being at Dover today. Counting with great certainty upon being there I have not given any orders to D. Nowling about hiring negroes for my Brother John. I wish little Joe and Abraham to be hired for...

Thomas Mann Randolph to Joseph Watkins, 31 Mar. 1797

I am going up to Richmond tomorrow with my children to be inoculated. I shall take lodgings somewhere and stay with them myself till they are safe through as Mrs Randolph cannot be with them on account of the age of the youngest, being just about teething. If Mrs Watkins & yourself will...

Maria Jefferson Eppes to John Wayles Eppes, 25 Nov. [1802]

I have only time to write a line to you My dearest husband, the incessant round of company we are in scarcely allowing time to dress to recieve them. I am at this moment writing whilst waiting for a gown to be smooth’d, tho the drawing room is full of ladys. your dear son bore the journey tho a...

Thomas Mann Randolph to Peter Carr, 24 Dec. 1802

As I could not be with you to read to you what I had written I leave it for you. My conversation with gentlemen here has made me think lighter of those infamous stories than I did: therefore I have not sent it to the Gazette as I intended: it being necessary to put my name to a paragraph such as...

Maria Jefferson Eppes to John Wayles Eppes, 10 Dec. [1803]

I was so hurried in writing my last to you My best beloved husband that I did not even think of asking you to let me know if the pain in your tooth had been effectually relieved by craming you suffer’d so much with it at Monticello that I have thought a great deal of it since & tho much...

Maria Jefferson Eppes to John Wayles Eppes, 21 Jan. [1804]

I had a letter last week from your dear Mother & from one from brother Jerman acquainting me with the birth of another Grandson & Bollings good health & in the first a request from your father to procure him some Umbrella trees, I shall be very much obliged to you if you will answer...

Will of Randolph Jefferson, 28 May 1808

I Randolph Jefferson of Buckingham county in virginia being in sound health, do make the following testamentary disposition of my estate.— I Give all the negroes which I shall own at the time of my death to be equally divided between my five sons Thomas, Robert Lewis, Field, Randolph & ...

Elizabeth Trist to Mary House Gilmer, 1 Sept. 1808

I have been with Mrs Monroe and Eliza ten days Harriet is with Mrs Divers unless she has is at Ridgway with Lucy as she meditated a visit there in a few days when I parted with her 12 days since, hearing that Lucy was at Farmington I summon’d up resolution to ride there on Horse back but...