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Showing 151 - 175 of 483 results

Cornelia J. Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 3 Aug. 1825

I am mounted upon a high chest in the cellar, my dear sister, in the midst of sweapers and scourers, for my time is so completely occupied by serving & entertaining company that I have not a quiet unemployed half hour even to devote to you, but write to you I will even in this sort of...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ann C. Morris, 8 Aug. 1825

I could never make you understand my dear Sister how impossible it is for me to be punctual, without any laziness on my part. but you have been kind enough to give me credit for my good intentions and wave all ceremony in writing your self, for which I am most grateful. we have allways a great...

Lafayette to Mary J. Randolph, 18–21 Aug. 1825

I am the first to write on Your Book, dear Mary Jefferson Randolph: the first I shall Ever be Among Your friends to love You and Your dear family, to Bestow Upon You, in Every Circumstance of Your life, the paternal good Wishes and feelings Which I am Happy to Be Entitled to Express

Philip St. George Cocke to John H. Cocke, 21 Aug. 1825

having put of writing to you until now with the expectation that you would be up here about this time to wait upon Genl Lafayette to Bremo, but having heard that he would not have time to visit you, and would be oblidged to leave here tomorrow, I concluded that if you had heard of his intentions...

Nicholas P. Trist to Virginia J. Randolph Trist, 25–26 Aug. 1825

You have heard before this of our having staid at Tufton to breakfast: we did not leave there ’till a quarter past six; and travelling very slow it was quite late before we got to Mrs Carter’s. There I got introduced to Wyndham Robertson, also on his way to the Springs, who has probably fulfilled...

John Hemmings to Septimia A. Randolph (Meikleham), 28 Aug. 1825

your Letter came to me on the 23th and hapey was I to embreasit to see you take it upon you self to writ to me and Let me know how your grand Pare was Glad am i to hear that he is no worst dear I hope you ar well and all the famely giv my Love to all your brothars Gorg with Randolph ...

Nicholas P. Trist to Virginia J. Randolph Trist, 30 Aug. 1825

You will receive tomorrow, beloved wife, the letter I wrote from Poplar forest, and which, for reasons therein stated, I did not send by mail. I left the forest on Sunday morning; reached Liberty between nine and ten, and found that Mr Gilmer had set out the evening previous for albemarle. The...

George G. Skipwith to John H. Cocke, 31 Aug. 1825

Though tardy in complying with your wishes perhaps it may still not be too late and that this may reach you before you send for us which should it you will do me a great favour to answer by Jessee when you send for us. Since you left us I have not made much progress in the Italian and Spanish...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 1 Sep. 1825

I must write to you My dear Ellen, when I can, and not wait for time to do it quietly and rationally. I have literally not one quiet hour from 5 in the morning my usual hour of rising, till 10 at night, when we generally retire. the odd half hours and quarters that I can command I will most...

Virginia J. Randolph Trist to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 3 Sep. 1825

I have atlength given up the keys & have time to write to you My Dearest Sister, to think of you I always find time even when most pressed by the labours of housekeeping & distracted by the crowds of company which we have had a constant succession of this summer. I believe I have entirely...

Benjamin F. Randolph to Virginia J. Randolph Trist, [10 Sept. 1825?]

I received your letter by Boling Garrett which greatly cheered the me the melancholy feeling which I would have unavoidably at leaveng you all I am very much pleased with Mr Lewis although we do not fare as well as we aught to do I find no fault with the table but we have to cut our wood make our...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 18-19 Sept. 1825

I wrote a hurried scrawl to Mr Coolidge by the last mail which would have been burnt if I had had time to collect my thoughts to do better, but although I went in to Nicholas’s pavillion and it rained furiously while I was there, I was so often interrupted, and even forced to leave My letter to...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 27 Sept. 1825

I have been long silent; and perhaps even now do not choose a favourable moment to write you; for you may still be at the Springs, wh. I am glad to hear from mother have been of service to you. You know that we did not stop, as we had intended, at West-Point; and your kind letters, of course,...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 5 Oct. 1825

I have received yours from the White Sulphur Springs; & am glad that you are better for your journey to them; indeed this is evident without your ing me so in set phrase; for the tenor of your letter is cheerful and shews improved health of body and mind. Ellen and myself often speak of , not...

John Wayles Eppes, Jr. to Martha B. Eppes, 9 Oct. 1825

You dont know how much I want to see you, and my sisters, I was truly sorry to hear that Sister Mary had been very sick, but I hope by this tim, her health is entirely restored to her again. I am sorry to inform you that some body attempted to break in the house, but did not succede in the...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 10 Oct. 1825

a fine fellow—a clergman by name John Brazer, (now a unitarian preacher in Salem, about 15 miles from Boston,) who when I was at Cambridge was the latin tutor, is going south—perhaps, to Monticello; and has offered to take charge of any thing we may wish to send. Ellen gives him a line to...

George G. Skipwith to John H. Cocke, 12 Oct. 1825

I avail myself of this opportunity offered by Mr Chapman going to Bremo to write you a few lines thinking that this would probably reach you before you are on your way to Brunswick. I hope you will not think that I act in conformity with Mr Chapman’s wishes but on the contrary with what I think...

Lafayette to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 12 Oct. 1825

I Most Affectionately thank you, my dear friend, for the letter I Have Received on the moment of my departure. Melancholy it Has Been, indeed, to Hear that Your Beloved father was Not Better and that the Omission of One night’s Laudanum Has Caused So much pain. the doctor Had Hopes to Remove it ...

Philip St. George Cocke to John H. Cocke, 12 Oct. 1825

I received your letter of the 11th this morning, by Mr Maxwell; and take the favourable opportunity of answering it by Mr Chapman, who is going down to Bremo tomorrow—Since the late unhappy occurrences here; every thing seems to be changed for the better; the young men are becoming more studious...