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Showing 376 - 400 of 486 results

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 14 Sept. 1827

I have only time to write a single line, (more or less) to enclose the power of attorney to Jefferson. it is difficient in the recital of the act of legislature which I did not possess nor was a copy of it to be found in Boston. but perhaps if Jefferson has actually received the stock which I...

John Ramsay to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 29 Sept. 1827

I have the honor to acknowledge the rect of your letter from Cambridge, with the accompanying power of Attorney, which I am happy to say, will enable me to bring the buisiness of the stock to a speedy close; when the proceeds shall be placed, in the Branch Bank...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 5 Oct. 1827]

I have done all in my power to make Gilmer’s stay here pleasant—but you well know how impossible it is for a man to see any thing properly in a day or even a week where there are so many things to call his attention at the same moment. He was accompanied by a Mr Wellford, of Fredericksburg, who...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 16 Oct. 1827

I write to you at the particular desire of Mr Sparks, who has been for two years in vain trying to obtain copies of letters (5 or 6 in number.) written by Mr J. to Ledyard the traveller, in the years 1785., 1787. & 1788—: these have been promised him by Jefferson, but have never been recd—and...

William Wirt to Dabney Carr, 27 Oct. 1827

It is an old saying you know that a blacksmith’s mare and a shoe-maker’s wife are generally the worst shod animals in the Parish—& it is certainly true that my dearest friends are the worst-treated of my correspondents—for strangers will not bear to have their letters neglected—& friends...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 5 Nov. 1827

I have yours in answer to mine respecting Mr Sparks’ application: Thank you for your immediate attention to my request: it is creditable to us both. Sparks sails for England in Decr early: his life of Ledyard will be read by every body here; in it there are many things favourable to Mr Jefferson...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [ca. 10 Nov. 1827]

I have this day put aboard the Brig Levant, for Richmond, on yr. a/c, the address of Bernard Peyton, sundry articles, viz an oil Cask; and cannister; a box of Sperm. candles; & a small box—marked N. P. T.—in the same vessell are 32 small kegs; containing best, and freshest white lead, just...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 26 Nov. 1827

I have been long waiting for the Brig William from Richmond to arrive that I may receive the books &c which are aboard her; but tho. two months have passed since she left Rd we have no news of her, and she must either have been blowed off, or lost in the late tremendous gales:—the truth is...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 4 Dec. 1827

I begin with your p.s. to the letter from Mary.—The lamps will please you and wear well. only remember the directions I gave you respecting the manner of using them: Jeff’s lead is warranted of the best quality, and I know it to be the freshest in the place. Jones is it seems appointed: I have no...

Robley Dunglison to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 5 Jan. 1828]

My wife, I am happy to think, is something better this morning, although her complaint still Continues—she decidedly is not worse. Mrs Gorman unfortunately does not suit us; she is weak & what is worse so overpowered by her distressed situation that she is rendered totally unfit to wait upon...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 3 Mar. 1828]

I have the pleasure to introduce to you Dr. Lieber; his name is already known to you, having been mentioned in former letters of mine: He came to this country to establish a Gymnasium and swimming school in Boston, and has done so with full success; Dr Lieber has also given lessons in German to...

Thomas Mann Randolph to Nicholas P. Trist, 11 Mar. 1828

My circumstances & state of health being afflicted with that Gout, or Rheumatic affection of the stomach which attacked me in August 1826, and state of Mind so influenced by no very pleasing associations with Monticello during the last short interval of my residence there, almost constant...

Virginia J. Randolph Trist to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 19 Mar. 1828

Nothing but the determination to write regularly to the dear ones from whom I am separated, could surmount the obstacles that lie in the way of it my dearest sister, and already half of my week to write has slipped away without my having had it in my power to fill the accustomed sheet. to no one...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, 24 Mar. 1828

I have many things to say, and but little time to say them in: I will begin therefore with the business part of your letters, it being of more interest to you than any other: Your books on Roman law are on their way to Charlottesville;—the shoes you ordered for Mr Madison have not been sent, for...

Cornelia J. Randolph to Virginia J. Randolph Trist, 30-31 Mar. 1828

I have the head ach, dear Virginia, & do not know whether I can write as long a letter as usual, but will not defer writing as tomorrow I shall be employed all day closely. I read your Louisiana schemes with pain & yet would not say no to them; the abandoning Monticello altogether would...

Thomas Mann Randolph to James Monroe, 1 May 1828

as I never go off of this mountain myself nowadays, since my new abode here, and have no attendant, your truly gratefull and duly honoured favour was very long in geting to my hands. I read your memoir immediately with that...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge, 2 May 1828

We arrived here at 6 o clock this morning My beloved Ellen after a most prosperous voyage of 18 hours. the swell round Judith’s point soon rendered the lady’s cabin, in which there were at least 20 ladies & 9 or ten children, a most uncomfortable residence, but My old friend ...

Ellen W. Randolph Coolidge to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 6 May 1828

Your letter of the 2nd my dearest mother, was joyfully received and relieved me from a portion of those vague apprehensions which always attend me for some time after parting with those I love. I always feel as if there were some ill-defined danger hovering over my absent friends, & am ready...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 7 May 1828]

The bearer Mr Higginson, of Cambridge, is a most excellent and valuable person, who is about visiting Va—has been very well acquainted with mother during her stay here, and one to whom we all wish you to pay every attention in your power.He may be accompanied by Prof. Norton, of Cambridge...

Hore Browse Trist to Nicholas P. Trist, 12 May 1828

I hope your editorial venture may succeed. There is only one objection to it, which would however apply to every other enterprise for making money, that is. The expence is present, the profit future. Does the establishment rest on a solid basis, or is its present prosperity at all dependent on...

Joseph Coolidge to Nicholas P. Trist, [before 14 May 1828]

Private! My last letter gave you an a/c of my efforts to engage a printer: I took unwearied pains to procure a suitable person, making very minute inquiries, and in every instance found that they were in vain; those whom I could most confidently have recommended falling away from their...