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Showing 51 - 75 of 82 results

Caroline Tufton (Barham) to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), 13 Aug 1789

We arrived here Wednesday night having spent two days at Sir Horace Mann’s near Canterbury, where there was a Cricket Match, the house quite full of company, and very few people we knew, added to being very much tired with our journey, made us very glad to get away, I am sure if you had been...

Caroline Tufton (Barham) to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), 2 Sept 1789

It is impossible for me to discribe, how happy I feel at hearing from you, and what ever pleasure I have felt at seeing my friends in England, it has not been equal to the pain of a seperation from you, which if not eternal, is so distant, as to afford me very little hope, but I will no longer...

Elizabeth Tufton to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), 18 Sept. [1789]

My dear Miss Jefferson I hope will not accuse me of neglect in not having thanked her for her letter & the canes which she has been so good as to send me. the truth is we have been in the country, where there was nothing happenned to entertain me sufficiently to write a very dull answer in...

Caroline Tufton (Barham) to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), 24 Sept. 1789

I have this moment received your letter and take the first opportunity of thanking you for it, and am afraid you will still be set out before this reaches you, you cannot imagine how sincerely we all lament your departure to America, for my part it seems as a fresh seperation, for while you were...

Elizabeth Tufton to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), 23 Oct. 1789

I have just received my dear Miss Jefferson’s kind letter which surprized very agreeably as I had seen some time ago in the newspapers, that you were at Cowes, we have frequently thought of you since, imagining you were on the sea by this time—I do not think we shall be wrong in our conclusions—I...

Thomas Mann Randolph (1741–93) to Thomas Mann Randolph, 1 Dec 1789

It was not my intention, when I wrote to you last, to offend you, disgust you, or even to give you any uneasiness even, for a moment but I find, from a paragraph in your letter: which I shall not quote to you; and to your leaving Tuckahoe in a hurry, and in bad Weather and going still Farther...

Caroline Tufton (Barham) to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), 19 Dec. 1789

It is impossible for me to express how much pleasure your kind letter gave me, which I intended to have answered last month, but was unfortunately prevented, I was quite unhappy to think you were in England without a possibility of our meeting, but I am now in expectation of hearing of your safe...

Bridget Hawkins Roper-Curzon to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

I was most extremely concern’d to find by a letter I received from Botidoux, that my dear Jefferson had been so much indisposed—illness has prevented my writing to inquire after you—but though I have hitherto been silent on that head, I trust you will easily credit the assurance of my having been...

Bridget Hawkins Roper-Curzon to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

Though I wrote to My Dear Jefferson but last Post, Yet I avail myself of a leisure moment, to thank her for a very friendly letter I received yesterday, & for the trouble she has so kindly taken to procure me a Cloak & etc—Believe me my dear Girl, I am truly sensible of the many marks of...

Bridget Hawkins Roper-Curzon to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

I am sensible my Dr Jefferson does not think it a trouble to oblige a friend therefore trust she will excuse ye liberty I am going to take in requesting she will execute ye following commissions for me: will you send for Mlle Bertrand & enquire what skins are ye most in fashion for Pelises, ...

Bridget Hawkins Roper-Curzon to Martha Jefferson Randolph, [ca. 1789]

I am extremely obliged to My Dear Jefferson, for the trouble she has taken about my Cloak—there is one part of her letter I do not perfectly understand, I will transcribe it—l’angola n’est pas tout a fait aussi beau, mais beaucoup moins cher et plus durable que le Cigne—I imagine you mean exactly...

Caroline Tufton (Barham) to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

I am very much obliged to you for the ring, which I shall value for your sake and I never will part with it. I am much hurt not to see you once more before we go, but Mr Jefferson likewise told the Duke it was better not, so we must submit: the waiscoat with the enclosed note is from the Duke, he...

Caroline Tufton (Barham) to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

there is a Ball here Monday, which I hope you will come to, the Duke would have sent a card, but I prevented him as I said I would tell you of it, I will certainly call upon you between this, and then, that we may settle what time you can come. I hope your cold is better and that polly was has...

Caroline Tufton (Barham) to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

I thought I should have seen you last night, as Miss Dashwood told me she expected you; it was to mention a Ball given by Monsieur Laborde, the same company is to be there as was at Mrs Coutts, and as you was ill at that time could not go, I hope you will be well enough for this, I do not exactly...

Caroline Tufton (Barham) to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

pray come this Evening at five o’ Clock, as we want to shew you a new work, which I dare say you will like very much. I am dying to see your verses, and want very much to know the secret, I can hardly flatter myself it is of any importance to me. Lord Bob will be of the party to night, but said...

Caroline Tufton (Barham) to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

I begin to think we shall never meet again. I hope you are not much frightened, but I believe we are as safe this part of the Town, if not more so than in most places. I am already quite tired of staying at home, and we cannot even come and see you, I am almost afraid of looking out of the...

Caroline Tufton (Barham) to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

you cannot imagine how disappointed we both are at your not being able to come this Evening, I wish your had taken better care of your Cold. pray tell Bothidout that we will send for her at seven o’ Clock to come to us that we may go all together. for I am sure Lady Radnor would not chuse to take...

Caroline Tufton (Barham) to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

I am ready to die with laughing at Bothid Botidoux’s note, it was too a clingish a great deal to go and tell Miss Bath, I am sure we shall never hear the last of it. there will be such crying. I will send you her note to morrow morning, or give it you at dinner, as I have not seen the Duke, and I...

Elizabeth Tufton to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

I have got a note from Mde de la Vaupaliere to invite us to dine with her monday that we may walk about with her daughters to see St Cloud—she also says says she shou’d be extremely happy to see you & desires me to say she wou’d send an invitation but I wrote her word I wou’d save her that...

Elizabeth Tufton to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

Tho’ Caroline has written I cannot resist the pleasure of thanking my dear Miss Jefferson for writing to me you can have no idea what pleasure I shall always have in hearing from you, I am almost selfish enough to wish you may not leave Paris so soon as I fear when you get to America surrounded...

Elizabeth Tufton to Martha Jefferson (Randolph), [ca. 1789]

Caroline is playing with Géardine but I write instead of her to intreat you will tell Botidoux it was only a joke of hers ours as the Duke does not wish her to know the contrary. we shall tell the same thing to Mrs Roberts if she asks— at Chapil. d pray do not tell Botidoux whether you know the...