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Showing 151 - 175 of 1264 results

Elizabeth Trist to Nicholas P. Trist, 3 June 1810

I, was delighted my Dear Nicholas at the receipt of your letter which was a testimony of your remembrance as also of your application to your duties, which from your Mothers Lamentation for the loss you had sustaind in the Death of your Father and her inability to pay the attention you required,...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 17 July 1810

I am fated not enjoy tranquility of mind for any length of time poor Mary what is to become of her and the family by Mr Grimes sophistry she is deprived of every means of support beside being involved in debt, gracious God what will not a deceiving villian effect. I am sorry that she did not...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 23 Aug. 1810

If any thing that William Brown cou’d do was to surprise me, your information wou’d have had that effect his conduct seems altogether Mysterious after the part he has acted to expose himself to a publick audience some of whom if he even had a thought he must have believe’d wou’d recognise him for...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 15 Sep. [1810]

I am uneasy my Dr friend at not hearing from you for so long a period hope you have had no new cause of distress in your family. The Country begins to be very sickly several families in this Village are down with violent Bilious fevers as yet there has been no mortality, except a young Lady by...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 24 Oct. [1810]

I shou’d have written to you My beloved friend ere this but I had nothing satisfactory to communicate Our passage down the Deleware was tedious not having, some part of the time a breath of wind but we had good entertainment and respectable company to the number of thirty including Servants we...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 28 Dec. 1810

you will be surprised to hear that we are still in Albemarle and very probably the bad weather may detain us some time longer altho Peachey has come to escort us, I begin to think it wou’d have been for our advantage if he had not come till the spring for my poor sister seems to despair of ever...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 7 Jan. 1811

I am afraid My Dr friend that I shall tire your patience by forcing so many of my scribbles upon you, but goodness often wounds it self—had you been less kind and discovered less feeling towards a distressd unfortunate family you might have escaped as well as many other of my acquaintance with...

Nancy Simms to Elizabeth Trist, 7 Jan. 1811

I recd my beloved Friends letter from Montecello a few days after its date, you say you were detained by the lameness of one of Mr Gilmers Horses and as the weather has for some time been very unfavourable to travelling—I have some hopes that this letter will find you still at Albemarle—I should...

David Bailie Warden to Martha Jefferson Randolph, [ca. 15 Jan. 1811]

I had the honour of sending you two Volumes from Baltimore and an engraving of Napoleon to this are of Mrs. Madison I now beg leave to inclose two copies of my translation of Marcus Aurelius which perhaps you have not seen—I returned yesterday from New york—hoping to hear something concerning my...

James Nelson Barker to Elizabeth Trist, 24 Feb. 1811

Many thanks dear Madam—But justice loses nothing by mercy and were I guilty my compunctions would only be increased by your kindness. My excuses may have been awkwardly made but that must not rob my assertions of their sincerity; and as I am desirous of more than partial belief I would fain...

Lucy Eppes Thweatt to Martha B. Eppes, 19 Mar. 1811

Changed indeed my dear Sister is our habitation by the absence of you all, I fear Matilda will not remain content she has been so gloomy that I have felt quite uneasy about her. Mr Thweatt has been constantly absent & only her & my self, she appears lost—we have a continuance of Perkins’s...

Harriet Hackley to Catharine Wistar Bache, 24 Mar. 1811

Can I flatter myself that my Dear Mrs bache will be pleased to hear from me after so long a silence? your affectionate letter was truly wellcome & I have no excuse to offer for so shameful a neglect in not answering it sooner than the state of my health, & spirits, which have both been...

David Bailie Warden to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 14 April 1811

I take the liberty of informing you that it will give me great pleasure to purchase for you, at Paris, any article you may wish to procure I have been persecuted in a violent manner by gen Armstrong who, contrary to his verbal and written declaration stated, after my departure from Washington...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 7 May 1811

Your kind favor of the 15th April was gratefully received and if you had not mention’d delicate health and weak sperits I shou’d have derived infinate pleasure from hearing from you for I really began to feel some little mortification at your long silence I came here last saturday in expectation...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 6 July 1811

your kind favor of the 9th June on the 4th of July I recd with joy and gratitude it was the first news I had of Marys arrival, and I began to be anxious about her if the same good fortune attends her in the settlement of her affairs with the Government as she experienced on the voyage it will...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 18–19 Oct. [1811]

I have been looking for a letter from you for some time, and began to be apprehensive least some of the family were sick, or somthing had happend to draw your attention from me for so long a period, for you have always been so kind and attentive to me, that I cou’d not attribute your silence to...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Elizabeth Trist, 12 Nov. 1811

I am truly obliged to you my Dear Friend for having written to me with out waiting for my answers in truth it is impossible for me to be regular in my correspondance with any one. I am at this moment writing in the room with 4 of the children chattering around me, and it is always the case more...

John Wayles Eppes to Unknown, [ca. 1812–1816]

I have the honour to transmit to you the enclosed letters—I have no personal acquaintance with the young gentleman in whose favour they are written. The gentlemen who have interested themselves for him are all men of reputation and worth. Mr Stephenson is Speaker of the Legislature of Virginia—Mr...

Maria Sabina Ross to Elizabeth Trist, 20 Jan. 1812

How often have I exclaimed, Why my friend this long silence, to suppose You had forsaken me was too injurious to Yourself and painful to me, Sometimes I would say, I judge her by myself for my dearest friend has become indifferent to me, but Your kind, and affectionate favor has awaked every...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 1 Feb. 1812

Your last favor My Dear friend was dated 13th October a long period to elapse without hearing from one who I never cease to think of with affection and respect, and in whoes happiness I feel the greatest interest If it was in my power not one trouble shou’d assail you, the current shou’d flow on...

Mary Trist Jones (Tournillon) to Catharine Wistar Bache, 25 June 1812

In my last letter I promised to give you an account of my affairs on the return of my Mother, but Alas, my health, which was then flattering, has prevented me, I have had a severe attack of my breast, which obliged me to submit to the opinion of my physician who had earnestly recommended bleeding...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 3 May 1812

I take the earliest opportunity to acknowledge the receipt of your Welcome favor which was to have been forwarded by Harmer he has beheaved most shockingly to be sure, and when I see him I shall give him a good scolding I wrote to Mrs Thompson for some little things that I wanted or shou’d want...