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Showing 251 - 275 of 1264 results

William A. Burwell to Wilson Cary Nicholas, 21 Sept. 1814

It was my intention to have calld at Warren but the unexpected call of C. & the necessity of visiting Bal previous to the meeting renderd it impossible—the Pt’s message which I have forwarded will give you all the information of a public nature, I can not add much to it— I have never...

John Wayles Eppes to Francis Eppes, 30 Sept. 1814

I have received your two letters & am very glad to hear you are well— I have purchased for you a two bladed knife as you desired and will forward it by Tom—The city of Washington looks very gloomy—The Presidents house and the capital were burnt—The offices of war and of the Treasury together...

John Wayles Eppes to Francis Eppes, 26 Oct. 1814

I am sorry to hear from your Mama that you have been sick—I feel pleasure however from learning that you have again recovered— I propose returning home at christmas—If nothing happens to prevent it my coming home I will inclose you money in time to meet me there—I shall probably be at home five...

Mary J. Randolph to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), [ca. 30 Oct. 1814]

as I promised to write to you first I am not surprised at your silence. I have planted all of the flower roots that you left with me & mama has given me several others of diferent kinds for you. I have learnt the multiplication table at last & done a few sums besides. little tim has got...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), 14 Nov. 1814

You were right in suposing My Dear Virginia That we would have written sooner but for want of your address. the moment we recieved it Mary wrote to you. I was very sick after you left us, the walk I believe was the cause of it, for I was taken with a violent fever and headach that night which...

Mary J. Randolph to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), [after 2 Nov. 1814]

I was very much disappointed at not receiving a letter from you by Brother Charles as I expected you would write. your little maid was born the 2nd of november I wish you would write us word what you want her named & I will try & persuade Betsey to let us name it I have read the little...

Cornelia J. Randolph to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), 7 Nov. 1814

I have been waiting for brother Charleses return all along to write to you, and had just determined to write by the post when he arrived, he is going to set of tomorrow and I have not time to write to Sister Ann by him, & besides that I wrote to her the other day. Papa has not returned yet...

Hore Browse Trist to Elizabeth Trist, 20 Nov. 1814

I have the pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of yours of last month (which was forwarded me from new Orleans) and that Mother presented us with a brother last thursday who is the image of his father. though Nicholas went immediately for the doctor who resides 10 miles from here and rode as fast...

John Wayles Eppes to Alexander J. Dallas, 26 Nov. 1814

Your letter to the chairman of the committee on the Bank question this morning has greatly mortified and astonished your friends—For myself I do assure you that nothing has occurred since my being in public life which has excited in my bosom such a sentiment of Despair—You have blasted our hopes...

Martha Jefferson Randolph to Virginia J. Randolph (Trist), 29 Nov. 1814

I will write you a few lines My Dear Virginia allthough I am in a great hurry. yet shall it never be said that I neglected you so much as to let so direct an opportunity pass with out some token of remembrance. I send you by Nancy some fur which perhaps you may be able to make some use of, though...

John Wayles Eppes to Alexander J. Dallas, 30 Nov. 1814

Your letter of the 25th was received late last Evening—The one I addressed to you was written under the impulse of feelings produced at the moment your communication was read—I viewed with apprehension and dread what appeared to me an official declaration that “public credit no longer existed”—...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 21 Dec. 1814

Altho we have not quite accomplish’d our half yearly occupation of cloathing the Negroes, from a wound in my thumb I am exempted from duty for the present, as I can not be altogether without employment my inclination urges me to chat a little with my dear and much esteem’d friend Mrs Bache who...

Will of Peter Carr, 14 Jan. 1815

(copy) In the name of God—Amen. I Peter Carr of Albemarle do make this last will in manner and form following 1st It is my desire that all my debts be paid with all convenient expedition: This as to my debts generally: with respect to those two, due to my Sister Cary, and sister Mary, it is...

John Armistead to Thomas Mann Randolph, 21 Jan. 1815

The legislatare having past a Law for raising troops It becomes necessary that applycations for Commissions should be immediately made and as Its my wish to continue in the Service, and having Served under you am induced to make the following request. If in your opinion I deserve the same, (ie a...

Ann C. Morris to William B. Giles, 7 Feb. 1815

I wrote to Mr Eppes a few days ago requesting him to call on you and read the packet which I took the liberty of forwarding, to your care, last week. By this day’s mail I send (in three packages) a copy of my...

Ann C. Morris to William B. Giles, 17 Feb. 1815

I did not intend imposing on your patience again, but, am anxious to know whether all the packages, which I took the liberty of forwarding to your care, reached Washington. If not, I shall obtain another copy of Mr R’s letter, determined it shall be seen in Virginia with a copy of my Answer. It...

Ann C. Morris’s Statement Regarding William B. Giles, 14 Mar. 1815

Early in 1790 I derived an exalted opinion of Mr Giles from an estimable young man by the name of Harrison. At different times I heard of Mr Giles defending me amid the fury of Enemies, not for my sake, because indeed our acquaintance was too slight, but in a way which evinced much benevolence of...

Ann C. Morris to William B. Giles, 22 Mar. 1815

It is unnecessary to describe the amiable Mrs Carrington to one who has ever been acquainted with her. Mrs Randolph (formerly Miss Beverley) is an ornament to human nature. Neither my husband or self can yet call to mind my ever having said Mr Randolph was particularly attentive to me at any...

John Wayles Eppes to Francis Eppes, 25 Apr. 1815

I have been so much occupied in the election that I have not had an opportunity of writing to you for some time in consequence of being from home on Tues day the post day—all the elections taking place on Mon day—Randolph has gained the election by 91. 61. votes—It has been produced in part by...