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Showing 26 - 50 of 771 results

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 17 July 1810

I am fated not enjoy tranquility of mind for any length of time poor Mary what is to become of her and the family by Mr Grimes sophistry she is deprived of every means of support beside being involved in debt, gracious God what will not a deceiving villian effect. I am sorry that she did not...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 23 Aug. 1810

If any thing that William Brown cou’d do was to surprise me, your information wou’d have had that effect his conduct seems altogether Mysterious after the part he has acted to expose himself to a publick audience some of whom if he even had a thought he must have believe’d wou’d recognise him for...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 15 Sep. [1810]

I am uneasy my Dr friend at not hearing from you for so long a period hope you have had no new cause of distress in your family. The Country begins to be very sickly several families in this Village are down with violent Bilious fevers as yet there has been no mortality, except a young Lady by...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to John B. Colvin, 20 Sept. 1810 [Quote]

The question you propose, Whether circumstances do not sometimes occur which make it a duty in officers of high trust to assume authorities beyond the law, is easy of solution in principle, but sometimes embarrasing in practice. a strict observance of the written laws is doubtless one of the high...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 24 Oct. [1810]

I shou’d have written to you My beloved friend ere this but I had nothing satisfactory to communicate Our passage down the Deleware was tedious not having, some part of the time a breath of wind but we had good entertainment and respectable company to the number of thirty including Servants we...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 28 Dec. 1810

you will be surprised to hear that we are still in Albemarle and very probably the bad weather may detain us some time longer altho Peachey has come to escort us, I begin to think it wou’d have been for our advantage if he had not come till the spring for my poor sister seems to despair of ever...

Elizabeth Trist to Catharine Wistar Bache, 7 Jan. 1811

I am afraid My Dr friend that I shall tire your patience by forcing so many of my scribbles upon you, but goodness often wounds it self—had you been less kind and discovered less feeling towards a distressd unfortunate family you might have escaped as well as many other of my acquaintance with...

Nancy Simms to Elizabeth Trist, 7 Jan. 1811

I recd my beloved Friends letter from Montecello a few days after its date, you say you were detained by the lameness of one of Mr Gilmers Horses and as the weather has for some time been very unfavourable to travelling—I have some hopes that this letter will find you still at Albemarle—I should...

David Bailie Warden to Martha Jefferson Randolph, [ca. 15 Jan. 1811]

I had the honour of sending you two Volumes from Baltimore and an engraving of Napoleon to this are of Mrs. Madison I now beg leave to inclose two copies of my translation of Marcus Aurelius which perhaps you have not seen—I returned yesterday from New york—hoping to hear something concerning my...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to Benjamin Rush, 16 Jan. 1811 [Quote]

I have the same good opinion of mr Adams which I ever had. I know him to be an honest man, an able one with his pen, and he was a powerful advocate on the floor of Congress. he has been alienated from me by belief in the wretched forgeries lying suggestions, contrived for electioneering purposes,...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to Benjamin Rush, 16 Jan. 1811 [Quote]

my present course of life admits less reading than I wish. from breakfast, or noon at latest, to dinner, I am mostly on horseback, attending to my farms or other concerns, which I find healthful to my body, mind, & affairs: and the few hours I can pass in my cabinet, are devoured by...

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to Destutt de Tracy, 26 Jan. 1811 [Quote]

permit me now to render my portion of the general debt of gratitude, by acknolegements in advance for the singular benefaction which is the subject of this letter, to tender my wishes for the continuance of a life so usefully employed, and to add the assurances of my perfect esteem and respect.

Extract from Thomas Jefferson to Destutt de Tracy, 26 Jan. 1811 [Quote]

I am not conscious that my participations in Executive authority have produced any bias in favor of the single executive; because the parts I have acted have been in the subordinate, as well as superior stations, and because, if I know myself, what I have felt, and what I have wished, I know...